Adobe Premiere Pro CC Learning Tips

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Adobe Premiere Pro CC is the heir apparent editing application for many editors. In order to make your transition easier, I’ve compiled a series of links to various official and unofficial resources, including Adobe sites, forums, YouTube videos, training resources, and various blog posts. This list is by no means all that’s out there, but it should provide a great starting point to become more comfortable with Premiere Pro CC.

Adobe and Adobe-related training resources

Adobe tutorials

Adobe Premiere Pro tips

Maxim Jago’s tips at Lynda

Maxim Jago’s tips at Peachpit

Lynda’s Adobe Premiere Pro training

Ripple Training – Premiere Pro CC 2015

Adobe-related blogs and YouTube channels

Dave Helmly’s DAV Tech Table

Jason Levine’s YouTube channel

Colin Smith’s YouTube channel

Dave Helmly’s presentation at Orlando Post Pros meeting – 2015 (webcast)

Forums

Adobe Filmmaker stories

Adobe Premiere Pro Forum

Creative COW Premiere Pro forum

Premiere-centric sites and YouTube channels

Jarle Leirpoll’s Premiere Pro blog

Retooled

Premiere Bro

Best Premiere Pro Quick Tips YouTube Channel

Premiere Pro Tips YouTube channel

Blog posts

VashiVisuals – Deadpool Premiere Pro Presets

VashiVisuals – Keyboard Layouts

VashiVisuals – Music Video Editing Tips

VashiVisuals – Pancake Timeline

Jonny Elwyn – Premiere posts

Jonny Elwyn – Premiere Pro Tools and Tutorials

Jonny Elwyn – Tips and Tricks

Jonny Elwyn – Tips for Better Editing in Premiere Pro

Jonny Elwyn – Tutorials for Better Editing in Premiere Pro

Premium Beat – Beginner’s Guide to Premiere Pro Shortcuts

Premium Beat – Match Frame and Replace Edit

Premium Beat – How to Clean up Audio in Premiere Pro

Premium Beat – Creating a Storyboard Edit in Premiere Pro

Premium Beat – AVCHD Editing Workflow

Premium Beat – How to Organize a Feature Film Edit

Premium Beat – 3 Quick Tips for Editing in Premiere Pro

Premium Beat – Time-Saving Premiere Pro CC Tips

Derek Lieu – Simple Tricks for Faster Editing in Premiere Pro

No Film School – Premiere Pro Keyboard Shortcuts

Wipster – 4 Reasons Why Premiere Pro is a Great Choice

Wipster – Master the Media Browser

Plug-ins, add-ons, other

Kinetic type and layer effects by TypeMonkey for After Effects

Post Notes Premiere Pro control panel

PDFviewer Premiere Pro control panel

Frame.io integration

Wipster.io integration

Axle Video integration

LookLabs SpeedLooks

FxFactory plug-ins

RedGiant Software plug-ins

Boris FX plug-ins

DigitalFilms – SpeedGrade Looks

Jarle’s Premiere Pro Presets

Note : this information is also included on the Editing Resources page accessible from the header of this blog. Future updates will be made there.

©2016 Oliver Peters

Spring Tools

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It’s often the little things that improve your editing workflow. Here are a few quick items that can expand your editing arsenal.

Hawaiki Super Dissolve

df1416_tools_3The classical approach to editing transitions suggests that all you need is a cut and a dissolve. Given how often most editors use a dissolve transition, it’s amazing that few NLE developers spend any time creating more than a basic video dissolve, fade or dip. After all, even the original Media Composer came with both a video and a film-style dissolve. Audio mixers are used to several different types of crossfades.

Since this is such a neglected area, the development team behind the Hawaiki plug-ins decided to create Super Dissolve – a dissolve transition plug-in for Final Cut Pro X with many more options. This installs through the FxFactory application. It shows up in the FCPX transitions palette as a dissolve effect, plus a set of presets for fades, dips and custom curves. A dissolve is nothing more than a blend between two images, so Super Dissolve exposes the same types of under-the-hood controls as After Effects and Photoshop artists are used to with compositing modes.

Drop the Super Dissolve in as a transition and you have control over blending modes, layer order, easing controls with timing, and the blurring of the outgoing and/or incoming image. Since you have control over the outgoing and incoming clips separately, different values can be applied to either side, thus enabling an asymmetrical effect. For example, a quick fade with a blur off the outgoing clip, while bringing the incoming side up more slowly. As with the default FCPX dissolve, there’s also an audio crossfade adjustment, since FCPX transitions can effect both audio and video when these elements are combined. If you really like the ability to finesse your transitions, then Super Dissolve hits the spot.

XEffects Audio Fades

df1416_tools_6Free is good, so check out Idustrial Revolution’s free effects. Although they are primarily a video effects developer for Motion and Final Cut Pro X, they recently added a set of audio fade presets for FCPX. Download and install the free pack and you’ll find the XEffects Fades group in the audio plug-ins section of your effects palette.

XEffects Fades includes a set of preset fade handles, which are applied to the audio on your timeline clips. Drag-and-drop the preset with the fade length closest to what you want and it automatically adjusts the fade handle length at both ends of that audio clip. If you want to tweak the length, apply the effect first and then adjust the length puck on the clip as needed. Existing lengths will be overwritten when you drop the effect onto the clip, so make sure you make these adjustments last.

AudioDenoise and EchoRemover

df1416_tools_5CrumplePop is another developer known for its video effects; but they, too have decided to add audio effects to their repertoire. AudioDenoise and EchoRemover are two Final Cut Pro X plug-ins sold through the FxFactory application. These two effects are easy-to-use Apple Audio Units filters designed to improve poorly recorded location audio. As with Apple’s own built-in controls, each filter includes a few sliders to adjust strength and how the effect is applied. When applying any audio “clean up” filter, a little goes a long way. If you use it to its extreme range, the result sounds like you are underwater. Nevertheless, these two filters do a very nice job with poor audio, without presenting the cost and complexity of other well-known audio products.

Alex4D Animated Transitions

df1416_tools_1For a little bit of spice in your Final Cut Pro X timelines, it’s worth checking out the Alex4D Animated Transitions from FxFactory. Alex Gollner has been a prolific developer of free Final Cut Pro plug-ins, but this is his first commercial effort. Animated Transitions are a set of 120 customizable transition effects to slide, grow, split and peel incoming or outgoing clips and lower third titles. Traditionally you’d have to build these effects yourself using DVE moves. But by dropping one of these effects onto a cut point between two clips, you quickly apply a dynamic effect with all the work already done. Simply pick the transition you like, tweak the parameters and it’s done.

Post Notes

df1416_tools_4One of the best features of Adobe applications is Extensions. This is a development “hook” within Premiere Pro or After Effects that allows developers to create task-oriented panels, tools and controls that effectively “bolt” right into the Adobe interface. One example for After Effects would be TypeMonkey (and the other “Monkeys”), which are kinetic effect macros. For Premiere there’s PDFviewer, which enables you to view your script (or any other document) in PDF format right inside the Premiere user interface.

A new extension for Premiere Pro CC is Post Notes. Once installed, it’s an interface panel within Premiere Pro that functions as a combined notepad and to-do list. These are tied to a specific sequence, so you can have a set of notes and to-dos for each sequence in your project. When a to-do item is completed, check it off to indicate that it’s been addressed. This tool is so straightforward and simple, you’ll wonder why every editing software doesn’t already have something like this built-in.

Hedge for Mac

df1416_tools_2With digital media as a way of life for most editors, we have to deal with more and more camera media. Quickly copying camera cards is a necessary evil and making sure you do this without corruption is essential. The Mac Finder really is NOT the tool you should be using, yet everyone does it. There are a number of products on the market that copy to multiple locations with checksum verification. These are popular with DITs and “data wranglers” and include Pomfort Silverstack, Red Giant Offload, and even Adobe Prelude.

A newcomer is Hedge for Mac. This is a simple, single-purpose utility designed to quickly copy files and verify the copies. There’s a free and a paid version. If you just want to copy to one or two destinations at a time, the free version will do. If you need even more destinations as a simultaneous copy, then go for the paid version. Hedge will also launch your custom AppleScripts to sort, transcode, rename or perform other functions. Transfers are fast in the testing I’ve done, so this is a must-have tool for any editors.

©2016 Oliver Peters

Deadpool

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Adobe has been on a roll getting filmmakers to adopt its Premiere Pro CC editing software for feature film post. Hot on the heels of its success at Sundance, where a significant number of the indie films we’re edited using Premiere Pro, February saw the release of two major Hollywood films that were cut using Premiere Pro – the Coen Brothers’ Hail, Caesar! and Tim Miller’s Deadpool.

Deadpool is one of Marvel Comics’ more unconventional superheroes. Deadpool, the film, is the origin story of how Wade Wilson (Ryan Reynolds) becomes Deadpool. He’s a mercenary soldier that gains accelerated healing powers through a rogue experiment. Left disfigured, but with new powers, he sets off to rescue his girlfriend (Morena Baccarin) and find the person responsible. Throughout all of this, the film is peppered with Deadpool’s wise-cracking and breaking the fourth wall by addressing the audience.

This is the first feature film for director Tim Miller, but he’s certainly not new to the process. Miller and his company Blur Studios are known for their visual effects work on commercials, shorts, and features, including Scott Pilgrim vs. the World and Thor: The Dark World. Setting out to bring as much of the post in-house, Miller consulted with his friend, director David Fincher, who recommended the Adobe Creative Cloud solution, based on Fincher’s experience during Gone Girl. Several editing bays were established within Blur’s facility – using new, tricked out Mac Pros connected to an Open Drives Velocity SSD 180TB shared storage solution.

Plugging new software into a large VFX film pipeline

df1016_deadpool_6Julian Clarke (Chappie, Elysium, District 9) came on board to edit the film. He explains, “I talked with Tim and was interested in the whole pioneering aspect of it. The set-up costs to make these permanent edit suites for his studio are attractive. I learned editing using [Apple] Final Cut Pro at version one and then I switched to Avid about four years later and have cut with it since. If you can learn [Avid] Media Composer, then [Adobe] Premiere Pro is fine. I was up to about 80% of my normal speed after just two days.”

To ease any growing pains of using a new editing tool on such a complex film, Miller and Adobe also brought in feature film editor Vashi Nedomansky (That Which I Love Destroys Me, Sharknado 2: The Second One, An American Carol) as a workflow consultant. Nedomansky’s job was to help establish a workflow pipeline and to get the editorial team up to speed with Premiere Pro. He had performed a similar role on Gone Girl. He says, “I’ve cut nine features and the last four have been using Premiere Pro. Adobe has called on me for that editor-to-editor interface and to help Blur set up five edit bays. I translated what we figured out with Gone Girl, but adapted it to Blur’s needs, as well as taking into consideration the updates made to the software since then. During the first few weeks of shooting, I worked with Julian and the assistant editors to customize their window layouts and keyboard shortcuts, since prior to this, the whole crew had primarily been using Avid.”

Deadpool was shot mostly with ARRI ALEXA cameras recording open gate 2.8K ARRIRAW. Additional footage also came from Phantom and RED cameras. Most scenes were recorded with two cameras. The original camera files were transcoded to 2K ProRes dailies in Vancouver. Back at Blur, first assistant editor Matt Carson would sync audio and group the clips into Premiere Pro multicam sequences.

Staying up with production

df1016_deadpool_2As with most features, Clarke was cutting while the production was going on. However, unlike many films, he was ready to show Miller edited scenes to review within 24 hours after the shoot had wrapped for the day. Not only a cut scene, but one already fleshed out with temporary sound effects and music. This is quite a feat, considering that Miller shot more than 500 hours of footage. Seeing a quick turnaround of edited scenes was very beneficial for Miller as a first-time feature director. Clarke adds, “My normal approach is to start cutting and see what works as a first draft. The assistant will add sound effects and temp music and if we hit a stumbling block, we move on to another scene. Blur had also created a lot of pre-vis shots for the effects scenes prior to the start of principal photography. I was able to cut these in as temp VFX. This way the scenes could play through without a lot of holes.”

df1016_deadpool_3To make their collaborative workflow function, Nedomansky, Clarke, and the assistants worked out a structure for organizing files and Premiere Pro projects. Deadpool was broken into six reels, based on the approximate page count in the script where a reel break should occur. Every editor had their own folder on the Open Drives SAN containing only the most recent version of whatever project that they were working on. If Julian Clarke was done working on Reel 1, then that project file could be closed and moved from Clarke’s folder into the folder of one of the assistants. They would then open the project to add temporary sound effects or create some temporary visual effects. Meanwhile, Clarke would continue on Reel 2, which was located in his folder. By keeping only the active project file in the various folders and moving projects among editors’ folders, it would mimic the bin-locking method used in shared Avid workflows.

In addition, Premiere Pro’s Media Browser module would also enable the editors to access and import sequences found within other project files. This is a non-destructive process. Older versions of the project files would be stored in a separate folder on the SAN in order to keep the active folders and projects uncluttered. Premiere Pro’s ability to work with folders as they were created in the Finder, let the editors do more of the organization at the Finder level than they normally would, had they been cutting with Avid systems.

Cutting an action film

df1016_deadpool_4Regardless of the software you use, each film presents a unique set of creative challenges. Clarke explains, “One scene that took a while was a long dialogue scene with Deadpool and Colossus on the highway. It’s quintessential Deadpool with a lot of banter and improv from Ryan. There’s not much story going on in the background at that time. We didn’t want to cut too much out, but at the same time we didn’t want to have the audience get lost in what’s supposed to be the bigger story. It took some time to strike the right balance. Overall the film was just about right. The director’s cut was about two hours, which was cut into the final length of one hour and 45 minutes. That’s just about the right amount to cut out, because you don’t end up loosing so much of the heart of the film.”

Many editors have a particular way they like their assistants to organize bins and projects. Clarke offers, “I tend to work in the frame view and organize my set-ups by masters, close-ups, and so on. Where I may be a little different than other editors is how I have my assistants organize action scenes. I’ll have them break down the choreography move-by-move and build a sequence of selected shots in the order of these moves. So for example, all the angles of the first punch, followed by all the angles of the next move – a punch, or block, or kick. Action scenes are often shot with so much coverage, that this lets me quickly zero in on the best stuff. It eliminates the scavenger hunt to find just the right angle on a move.”

df1016_deadpool_8The script was written to work in a nonlinear order. Clarke explains how that played out through the edit, “We stood by this intention in the editing. We found, in fact, that the film just didn’t work linearly at all. The tone of the two [scripted] timelines are quite different, with the more serious undertones of the origin story and the broad humor of the Deadpool timeline. When played sequentially, it was like oil and water – two totally different movies. By interweaving the timelines, the tone of the movie felt more coherent with the added bonus of being able to front load action into the movie to excite the audience, before getting into the heavier cancer part of the story.”

One editing option that might come to mind is that a character in a mask offers an interesting opportunity to change dialogue without difficult sync issues. However it wasn’t the sort of crutch some might assume. Clarke says, “Yes, the mask provided a lot of opportunity for ADR. Though this was used more for tweaking dialogue for plot clarity or to try out alternate jokes, than a wholesale replacement of the production track. If we liked the production performance we generally kept it, and embraced the fact that the mask Ryan was wearing would dull the audio a bit. I try to use as little ADR as possible, when it comes to it being used for technical reasons, rather than creative ones. I feel like there’s a magic that happens on set that is often hard to replicate in the ADR booth.”

Pushing the envelope

df1016_deadpool_7The editing systems proved to offer the performance needed to complete a film of this size and complexity. Vashi Nedomansky says, “There were 1400 effects shots handled by ten vendors. Thanks to the fact that Blur tricked out the bays, the editors could push 10 to 15 layers of 2K media at a time for temp effects – in real-time without rendering. When the film was locked, audio was exported as AAF for the sound facility along with an H.264 picture reference. Blur did many of the visual effects in-house. For final picture deliverables, we exported an XML from Premiere Pro, but also used the Change List tool from Intelligent Assistance. This was mainly to supply the list in a column format that would match Avid’s output to meet the studio’s requirements.”

df1016_deadpool_5I asked Clarke and Nedomansky what the team liked best about working with the Adobe solution. Nedomansky says, “I found that the editors really liked the tilde key [on the keyboard], which in Premiere Pro brings any window to fullscreen. When you have a timeline with 24 to 36 tracks of temp sound effects, it’s really nice to be able to make that fullscreen so that you can fine-tune them. They also liked what I call the ‘pancake timeline’. This is where you can stack two timelines over each other to compare or pull clips from one into the other. When you can work faster like this, there’s more time for creativity.” Clarke adds, “I used a lot of the time-remapping in After Effects. Premiere Pro’s sub-frame audio editing is really good for dialogue. When Avid and Apple were competing with Media Composer and Final Cut Pro it was very productive for both companies. So competition between Avid and Adobe is good, because Premiere Pro is very forward-thinking.”

Many NLE users may question how feature films apply to the work they do. Nedomansky explains, “When Kirk Baxter used Premiere Pro for Fincher’s Gone Girl, the team requested many features that they were used to from Final Cut Pro 7. About 200 of those suggestions have found their way as features into the current release that all Creative Cloud customers receive. Film editors will stress a system in ways that others won’t, and that information benefits all users. The important takeaway from the Deadpool experience is that after some initial adjustment, there were no showstoppers and no chaos. Deadpool is a monster film, but these are just tools. It’s the human in the chair making the decision. We all just want to work and not deal with technical issues. Whatever makes the computer invisible – that’s the power.”

Deadpool is certainly a fun rid, with a lot of inside jokes for veteran Marvel fans. Look for the Stan Lee cameo and be sure to stay all the way through the end credits!

Watch director Tim Miller discuss the choice to go with Adobe.

Originally written for Digital Video magazine / CreativePlanetNetwork.

©2016 Oliver Peters

More LUTs from IWLTBAP

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With more cameras shooting in some form of a log or flat color profile and more editing software being able to integrate color look-up tables (LUTs), numerous developers have designed their own LUT packages. Some, like Koji, strive to duplicate the colorimetry of certain film stocks, while others, such as SpeedLooks from LookLabs, create stylized “look” files that give you a range of creative color correction choices.

One new developer offering a package of easy to use LUTs is French filmmaker IWLTBAP. Through the website, you can pick up a comprehensive package of LUTs in the 32x32x32 .cube format, which are compatible with most modern editing and compositing software applications. If you edit in Adobe Premiere Pro CC, the Lumetri Color panel lets you browse and add any .cube LUTs you’ve saved on your hard drives. If you cut in Apple Final Cut Pro X, then the addition of a LUT plug-in, like Color Grading Central’s LUT Utility, enables you to add third-party LUTs to any clip on the timeline.df1316_iwltbap_4

I took these LUTs for a spin and like most LUT packages, they come in a groups. First you have Utility LUTs, which are designed to convert color spaces from log to Rec709 (the standard video color space) or in the opposite direction. These are organized by camera type, since not all manufacturers use the same logarithmic values. Then the color correction or “look” LUTs are grouped into Standard and Log versions.

The Standard LUTs are to be applied to images that are already in Rec709 color space, while the Log versions can be used as a one-step LUT to be applied to generic log images. For example, you could apply both a Log-to-Rec709 Utility LUT and a second LUT from the Standard group to achieve your result. Or simply apply the single Log version to that same clip and end up with similar results. The dual-LUT approach gives you more incremental control over the Log conversion based on camera models, whereas the single-step solution is designed for generic log images. However, both can yield the desired grade, depending on the clip. In addition to the paid LUT package, IWLTBAP offers two Bonus LUTs, which are available as a free download from the website.

df1316_iwltbap_2There are over 80 LUTs in each group and these are organized by color style and number. The numbers don’t really mean anything. In other words, they aren’t an attempt to mimic a film stock number. As you ascend in numbers, the next step is a more aggressive or somewhat different version of the previous. The key is the prefix and suffix for each. These LUT files carry a STD or LOG suffix so you know whether these are from the Log or Standard group. Then there’s a prefix: C for cold, H for hot, W for warm, F for film, and X for creative. Each style has several variations within that general look. For example, the LUT file labelled “F-9490-STD.cube” is a LUT with a filmic curve designed for a Rec709 image.

df1316_iwltbap_7When working with LUTs, it’s often hard to know what result you get until you try it. Then if you don’t like the look, you have to continue to slowly browse through your LUT files – applying each, one at a time – until you get the right look. Often that can lead to a lot of trial and error. The IWLTBAP package ships with lightweight Windows and Mac preview applications, however, the developer warns of some occasional instability on some machines. The easiest solution is to use their web-based LUT previewer. Simply upload a reference JPEG from your clip and then toggle through the LUTs to preview how those will affect the shot.

df1316_iwltbap_6I ran some tests on Blackmagic Design camera footage in both FCPX and Premiere Pro CC and got some really pleasing results. In the case of FCPX, if you use LUT Utility, you have to copy the .cube files into LUT Utility’s Motion Templates folder. This is found under Effects/CGC. Files stored there become visible in the LUT Utility pulldown menu. Note that only the first 50 or so files in that folder can be accessed, so be selective. If you apply two instances of the LUT Utility to a clip, then you can apply a Log-to-Rec709 conversion in the first and then the creative look LUT in the second. This plug-in has a mix slider, so you can adjust the intensity of the LUT to taste. As an effects plug-in, you can also place other effects, such as color correction in-between the two LUT Utility effects as part of that stack of effects. Doing this gives you nice control over color within FCPX with very little overhead on the application’s performance.

df1316_iwltbap_3If you are an FCPX user that has adopted Color Grading Central’s ColorFinale grading tool as your go-to color correction plug-in, then all of this LUT management within the application can be simply handled from the ColorFinale interface itself. Stack layers of LUTs and other color tools all inside the ColorFinale panel. LUT choices can be added or removed using the integrated LUT Manager and then relaunching FCPX to activate them as part of ColorFinale.

If you are a Premiere Pro CC editor, then the latest version was enhanced with the Lumetri Color panel. This control is organized as a stack of color modules, which include two entry points to add a LUT – in the Basic and the Creative tabs. In my testing of the new URSA footage, I applied a Log-to-Rec709 LUT for the URSA in Basic and then one the “look” LUTs, like the free Aspen standard version, in Creative. You still have all the other color control in the Lumetri panel to fine-tune these, including the intensity level of the LUT.

df1316_iwltbap_5LUTs are a creative tool that should be thought of as a stylistic choice. They aren’t an instant fix and shouldn’t be the only tool you use to color correct a clip. However, the LUTs from IWLTBAP provide a good selection of looks and moods that work well with a wide range of shots. Plus the package is very affordable and even more so if you get it after reading this blog! Readers who are interested can get 25% off of the retail price using the discount code DIGITALFILMS. Or by using this direct link.

Last but not least, check out the free, downloadable 4K film grain clip. It’s a ten second ProRes file that can be overlaid or blended to add grain to your shot.

©2016 Oliver Peters

Hail, Caesar!

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Combine kidnapping, mystery, farce, and a good measure of quirkiness, and you’ve defined the quintessential Coen Brothers script. Complete with a cast of Coen alums, Hail, Caesar! is just such a film. Joel and Ethan Coen’s latest is set in the motion picture factory town of Hollywood in the 1950s. Eddie Mannix (Josh Brolin) is a studio fixer tasked with finding Baird Whitlock (George Clooney), one of the studio’s biggest money-makers. Whitlock has been kidnapped in the middle of production of a Bible epic by a group called “The Future”. Of course, that’s not Mannix’s only dilemma, as he has other studio problems he needs to deal with, such as disgruntled director Laurence Laurentz (Ralph Fiennes) and personal issues by starlet DeeAnna Moran (Scarlett Johansson).

The Hail, Caesar! story idea has been kicking around for over a decade before the Coens finally brought it into production. Along with being a concept that fits right into their wheelhouse, it’s also a complex production. In this story about the Golden Age of Hollywood, much of the film involves movies within the movie. The tale weaves in and out of multiple productions being filmed on the fictional Capitol Pictures lot.

In keeping with the texture of films of that era, Hail, Caesar! was shot on film by long-time Coen director of photography, Roger Deakins (True Grit, No Country for Old Men, The Ladykillers). Deakins’ first choice might have been the ARRI ALEXA, but agreed that film was the appropriate solution and so shot with an ARRI 535-B to Kodak Vision3 negative stock. Fotokem handled development with EFILM covering telecine transfer, finishing, and digital intermediate color correction.

Time for a fresh change

Although they are lovers of the film image, Joel and Ethan Coen were also among the first to embrace Apple Final Cut Pro in their transition to digital editing for the film Intolerable Cruelty. They had been using Final Cut Pro up until Inside Llewyn Davis; however, it had become sufficiently “long in the tooth” that it was time for a change. This brought them to Adobe Premiere Pro CC. I recently interviewed Katie McQuerrey about this shift. She is credited as an additional or associate editor of numerous Coen films (Inside Llewyn Davis, True Grit, Burn After Reading) – a role which she describes as being Joel and Ethan’s right-hand person in the cutting room. For Hail, Caesar!, this included interfacing with Adobe and handling the general workflow so that Premiere Pro was a functional editing tool for the filmmakers.

df0916_hailcaesar_6McQuerrey explains, “After Apple stopped supporting Final Cut Pro 7 we knew it was time to change. We looked at Final Cut Pro X, but because of its lack of audio editing functions, we knew that it wasn’t right for us. So, we decided to give Premiere Pro a try. David Fincher had a successful experience with Gone Girl and we knew that Walter Murch, who is a friend of the Joel and Ethan’s, was using it on his next film. I’ve edited on Avid, Final Cut, and now Premiere Pro and they all make you adjust your editing style to adapt to the software. Joel and Ethan had only ever edited digitally on Final Cut Pro, so Premiere Pro provided the easiest transition. [Avid] Media Composer is very robust for the assistant editor, but a bit restrictive for the editor. I’m on an Avid job right now after a year away from it and miss some of the flexibility that Premiere Pro offers. You really come to appreciate how fluid it is to edit with. I think both Final Cut Pro 7 and Premiere Pro are better for the editor, but they do add a bit more stress on the assistants. Of course, Joel and Ethan were generally shielded from that.”

df0916_hailcaesar_2One of the unknowns with Premiere Pro was the fact that Hail, Caesar! was being shot on film. Avid has tried-and-true methods for tracking film keycode, but that was never part Premiere Pro’s architecture. Assistant editor David Smith explains, “EFILM scanned all of the negative at 2K resolution to ProRes for our cutting purposes. On an Avid job, they would have provided a corresponding ALE (Avid Log Exchange list) for the footage and you would be able to track keycode and timecode for the dailies. For this film, EFILM sync’ed the dailies and provided us with the media, as well as a Premiere Pro project file for each day. We were concerned about tracking keycode to turn over a cut list at the end of the job. Adobe even wrote us a build that included a metadata column for keycode. EFILM tracks their transfers internally, so their software would reference timecode back to the keycode in order to pull selects for the final scan and conform. At their suggestion, we used Change List software from Intelligent Assistance to provide a cut list, plus a standard EDL generated from Premiere Pro. In the end, the process wasn’t that much different after all.” EFILM scanned the selected negative clips at 4K resolution and the digital intermediate color correction was handled by Mitch Paulson under Roger Deakins’ supervision.

Adapting Premiere Pro to the Coen Brothers workflow

df0916_hailcaesar_3It was Katie McQuerrey’s job to test drive Premiere Pro ahead of the Coens and provide assistance as needed to get them up to speed. She says, “Joel was actually up to speed after a day or so. Initially we all wanted to make Premiere Pro work just like Final Cut, because it appears similar. Of course, many functions are quite different, but the longer we worked with it, the more we got used to some of  the Premiere Pro ways of doing things. As functionality issues came up, Adobe would make adjustments and send new software builds. I would test these out first. When I thought they would be ready for Joel and Ethan to use, we’d install it on their machines. I needed to let them concentrate on the edit and not worry about software.”

Joel and Ethan Coen developed a style of working that stems from their film editing days and that carried over into their use of Final Cut Pro. This was adjusted for Premiere Pro. McQuerrey continues, “Ethan and Joel work on different computers. Ethan will pick selected takes and mark ins and outs. Then he saves the project and dings a bell. Joel opens that project up to use as he assembles scenes. With FCP you could have multiple projects open at once, but not so with Premiere. We found out from Adobe that the way to handle this was through the Media Browser module inside of Premiere. Joel could browse the drive for Ethan’s project and then access it for specific sequences or selected shots. Joel could import these through Media Browser into his project as a non-destructive copy, letting Ethan continue on. Media Browser is the key to working collaboratively among several editors on the same project.” Their edit system consisted of several Mac Pro “tube” models connected to Open Drives shared storage. This solution was developed by workflow engineer Jeff Brue for Gone Girl and is based on using solid state drives, which enable fast media access.

df0916_hailcaesar_5As with all films, Hail, Caesar! posed creative challenges that any application must be able to deal with. McQuerrey explains, “Unlike other directors, Joel and Ethan wait until all the shooting is done before anything is cut. I wasn’t cutting along with dailies as is the case with most other directors. This gave me time to get comfortable with Premiere and to organize the footage. Because the story includes movies within the movie, there are different aspect ratios, different film looks and color and black-and-white film material. Editorially it was an exciting project because of this. For example, if a scene in the film was being ‘filmed’ by the on-camera crew, it was in color and should appear to play out in real-time as you see the take being filmed. This same sequence might also appear later in a Moviola viewer, as black-and-white, edited film. This affected how sequences were cut. Some shots that were supposed to be real-time needed to look like one continuous take. Or someone in the film may be watching a rough cut, therefore that part had to be cut like a rough cut. This is a film that I think editors will like, because there are a lot of inside jokes they’ll appreciate.”

Fine tuning for the feature film world

df0916_hailcaesar_4One criticism of Adobe Premiere Pro CC has been how it handles large project files, particularly when it comes to load times. McQuerrey answers, “The Open Drives system definitely helped with that. We had to split the film up into a separate projects, for cuts, sound, visual effects, music, etc. in order to work efficiently. However, as we got later into the post we found that even the smaller projects had grown to the size that load times got much slower. The remedy was to cull out old versions of sequences, so that these didn’t require indexing each time the project was opened. Periodically I would create archive projects to keep the oldest sequences and then delete most of the oldest sequences from the active project. This improved performance.”

The filmmaking team finished Hail, Caesar! with a lot of things they liked about their new software choice. McQuerrey says, “Joel likes some of the effects features in Premiere Pro to build transitions and temp comps. This film has more visual effects than a usual Coen Brothers film, including green screens, split screens, and time remaps. Many of the comps were done in Premiere, rather than After Effects. Ethan and Joel both work differently. Ethan would leave his bins in list view and do his mark-ups. On the other hand, Joel also really liked the icon view and hover scrubbing a lot. Temp sound editing while you are picture editing is very critical to their process. They’ll often use different takes or readings for the audio than for the picture, so how an application edits sound is as important – if not more so – than how it edits picture. We had a couple of bumps in the road getting the sound  tracks interface working to our liking, but with Adobe’s help in building new versions of software for us, we got to the place where we really appreciated Premiere’s sound tools.”

Katie McQuerrey and I wrapped up the interview with an anecdote about the Coens’ unique approach to their new editing tool. McQuerrey explains, “With any application, there are a number of repetitive keystrokes. At one point Joel joked about using a foot pedal, like on an old upright Moviola. At first we laughed it off, but then I checked around and found that you could buy custom control devices for video game play, including special mice and even foot controls. So we ordered a foot pedal and hooked it up to the computer. It came with it own software that let us map command functions to the pedal. We did this with Premiere’s snapping control, because Joel constantly toggles it on and off!” It’s ironic, given the context of the Hail, Caesar! story, but here you have something straight out of the Golden Age of film that’s found itself useful in the digital age.

Click here for Adobe’s behind-the-scenes look.

Originally written for Digital Video magazine / CreativePlanetNetwork.

©2016 Oliver Peters

Adobe Premiere Pro CC Tips

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Adobe Premiere Pro CC is the dominant NLE that I encounter amongst my clients. Editors who’ve shifted over from Final Cut Pro “classic” may have simply transferred existing skills and working methods to Premiere Pro. This is great, but it’s easy to miss some of the finer points in Premiere Pro that will make you more productive. Here are seven tips that can benefit nearly any project.

df0616_ppro_1LUTs/Looks – With the addition of the Lumetri Color panel, it’s easy to add LUTs into your color correction workflow. You get there through the Color workspace preset or by applying a Lumetri Color effect to a timeline clip. Import a LUT from the Basic Correction or Creative section of the controls. From here, browse to any stored LUT on your hard drive(s) and it will be applied to the clip. There are plenty of free .cube LUTs floating around the web. However, you may not know that Look files, created through Adobe SpeedGrade CC in the .look format, may also be applied within the Creative section. You can also find a number of free ones on the web, including a set I created for SpeedGrade. Unlike LUTs, these also support effects used in SpeedGrade.

df0616_ppro_2Audio MixingPremiere Pro features very nice audio tools and internal audio mixing is a breeze. I typically use three filters on nearly every mix I create. First, I will add a basic dynamic compressor to all of my dialogue tracks. To keep it simple, I normally use the default preset. Second, I will add an EQ filter to my music tracks. Here, I will set it to notch out the midrange slightly, which lets the dialogue sit a bit better in the mix. Finally I’ll add limiting to the master track. Normally this is set to soft clip at -10db. If I have specific loudness specs as part of my delivery requirements, then I’ll route my mix through a submaster bus first and apply the limiting to the submaster. I will apply the RADAR loudness meter to the master bus and adjust accordingly to be compliant.

df0616_ppro_3Power windows – This is a term that came from DaVinci Resolve, but is often used generically to talk about building up a grade on a shot by isolating areas within the image. For example, brightening someone’s face more so than the overall image. You can do this in Premiere Pro by stacking up more than one Lumetri Color effect onto a clip. Start by applying a Lumetri Color effect and grade the overall shot. Next, apply a second instance of the effect and use the built-in Adobe mask tool to isolate only the selection that you want to add the second correction to, such as an oval around someone’s head. Tweak color as needed. If the shot moves around, you can even use the internal tracker to have your mask follow the object. Do you have another area to adjust? Simply add a third effect and repeat the process.

df0616_ppro_4Export/import titles – Premiere Pro titles are created in the Title Designer module and these titles can be exported as a separate metadata file (.prtl format). Let’s say that you have a bunch of titles that you plan to use repeatedly on new projects, but you don’t want to bring these in from one project to the next. You can do this more simply by exporting and re-importing the title’s data file. Simply select the title in the bin and then File/Export/Title. The hitch is that Adobe’s Media Browser will not recognize the .prtl format and so the easiest way to import it into a new project is to drag it from the Finder location straight into the new Premiere Pro project. This will create a new title inside of the new project. Both instances of this title are unique, so editing the title in any project won’t effect how it appears elsewhere.

df0616_ppro_5Replace with clip – I work on a number of productions where there’s a base version of a commercial and then a lot of versions with small changes to each. A typical example is a spot that uses many different lower third phone numbers, which are market-specific. The Replace function shaves hours off of this workflow. I first duplicate a completed sequence and rename it. Then I select the correct phone number in the bin, followed by selecting the clip in the timeline to be changed. Right-click and choose Replace with Clip/From Bin. This will update the content of my timeline clip with the new phone number. Any effects or keyframes that have been applied in the timeline remain.

df0616_ppro_6Optical flow speed changes – In a recent update, optical flow interpolation was added as one of the speed change choices. Other than the obvious uses of speed changes, I found this to be a get way of creating slower camera moves that look nearly perfect. Optical flow can be tricky – sometimes creating odd motion artifacts – and at other times it’s perfect. I have a camera slider move or pan along a mantle containing family photos. The move is too fast. So, yes, I can slow it down, but the horizontal motion will leave it as stuttering or blurred. However, if I slow it to exactly 50% and select optical flow, in most cases, I get very good results. That’s because this speed and optical flow have created perfect “in-between” frames. A :05 move is now :10 and works better in the edit. If I’m going to use this same clip a lot, I simply render/export it is as a new piece of media, which I’ll bring back into the project as if it were a VFX clip.

df0616_ppro_7Render and replace – Premiere Pro CC is great when you have a ton of different camera formats and want to work with native media. While that generally works, a large project will really impede performance, especially in the editing sequence. The alternative is to transcode the clips to an optimized or so-called mezzanine format. Adobe does this in the sequence rather than in the bin and it can be done for individual clips or every clip within the sequence. You might have a bunch of native 4K .mp4 camera clips in a 1080p timeline. Simply select the clips within the timeline that you would like to transcode and right-click for the Render and Replace dialogue. At this point you have a several options, including whether to use clip or sequence settings, handle length, codec, and file location. If you choose “clip”, then what you get is a new, trimmed clip in an optimized codec, which will be stored in a separate folder. This becomes a great way to consolidate your media. The clip is imported into your bin, so you have access to both the original and the optimized clip at the original settings. Therefore, your consolidated clips are still 4K if that’s how they started.

This also works for Dynamic Link After Effects compositions. Render and Replace those for better timeline performance. But if you need to go back to the composition in order to update it in After Effects, that’s just a few clicks away.

©2016 Oliver Peters

Serif Affinity Photo and Affinity Designer

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Photoshop users who are looking for an alternative to Adobe may find a refuge in Affinity Photo and Affinity Designer. Both are being developed for the Mac platform by British software developer Serif. This is a separate line from their Windows products and is their first collection built from the ground up to take advantage of the newest Mac and OS X capabilities. Affinity Photo, which was released on July 9 after an extended public beta period, competes with Adobe Photoshop. Affinity Designer is aimed at Adobe Illustrator. Both applications are available through the Mac App Store. They share a common file format. Affinity Designer just won the Apple Design Award at WWDC 2015. Due later this year will be Affinity Publisher – a desktop publishing application.

df3315_affinity_3I’ve been testing both Affinity Photo and Affinity Designer for a few months and have been very impressed. Most of it has initially been with the public beta of Photo. Since I’m not a big Illustrator user, I really can’t adequately compare Illustrator and Designer, except to say that it’s a very capable vector-based drawing and design application. The application will import .ai files, but roundtrip compatibility is largely through certain common standards: PNG, TIFF, JPEG, GIF, SVG, EPS, PSD or PDF. The layout is built around three modes called “personas”. Start in the Draw Persona to create your document. Switch to the Pixel Persona for paint and adjustment functions. Finally, export through the Export Persona.

I spent more time with Affinity Photo, to see how viable it is as a Photoshop replacement. Its four modes includes the Photo, Liquify, Develop, and Export Personas. Photo is the closest to Photoshop in style and toolset, while Develop is more like the Lightroom toolkit. Liquify is designed for image distortion based on a mesh. Most of the image adjustment tools in the Photo Persona are adjustments layers.

df3315_affinity_2In general, Affinity Photo feels a lot like Adobe Photoshop, but as with any of these tools, things are in enough different places that experienced Photoshop users will be counteracting years of muscle memory in making the switch. Nevertheless, you’d have a great comfort factor with Affinity Photo, since the toolset, adjustment layers and layer styles working in a similar fashion. One powerful set of effects is Live Filter layers. These are similar to Adjustment Layers in that they are editable and don’t bake an effect into the layer. The difference is that a Live Filter can be added to that layer only and doesn’t affect everything beneath it, like a standard adjustment layer. Live Filters can be re-arranged, disabled or edited at any time without relying on undo.

Compatibility between Affinity Photo and Adobe Photoshop is good and Serif states that they are aiming for the best compatibility on the market. In this current version, I had better luck going from Photo into Photoshop using a layered .psd file, than I did bringing a file created in Photoshop into Photo. The usual culprits are layer effects and vector based objects. In Photoshop, the Photo-created adjustment layer effects came across, but text with layer effects was merged into a rasterized layer with the layer effects baked in. When I went from Photoshop to Photo, layer effects were simply dropped. Affinity Photo is supposed to use third-party Photoshop plug-ins, but my attempts to use Magic Bullet Looks crashed Photo. Unlike Pixelmator (another Mac-based Photoshop alternative), Affinity Photo cannot use Quartz Composer-based filters, such as those from FxFactory. According to Serif, they will be working with plug-in manufacturers to improve the app-side support for 64-bit plug-ins.

If you aren’t completely locked into compatibility with Adobe Photoshop files sent to and from clients – and you are interested in an alternative solution – then the Affinity applications from Serif are a very strong alternative for Mac users. They are fun, fast and yield great results.

Originally written for Digital Video magazine / CreativePlanetNetworks.

©2015 Oliver Peters