CrumplePop and FxFactory

If you edit with Final Cut Pro – either the classic and/or new version – then you are familiar with two of its long-running plug-in developers. Namely, FxFactory (Noise Industries) and CrumplePop. Last year the two companies joined forced to bring the first audio plug-ins to the FxFactory plug-in platform. CrumplePop has since expanded its offerings through FxFactory to include a total of six audio and video products. These are AudioDenoise, EchoRemover, VideoDenoise, AutoWhiteBalance, EasyTracker, and BetterStabilizer.

Like much of the eclectic mix of products curated through FxFactory, the CrumplePop effects work on a mix of Apple and Adobe products (macOS only). You’ll have to check the info for each specific plug-in to make sure it works with your application needs. These are listed on the FxFactory site, however, this list isn’t always complete. For example, an effect that is listed for Premiere Pro may also work in After Effects or Audition (in the case of audio). While most are cross-application compatible, the EasyTracker effect only works in Final Cut Pro X. On the other hand, the audio filters work in the editing applications, but also Audition, Logic Pro X, and even GarageBand. As with all of the FxFactory effects, you can download a trial through the FxFactory application and see for yourself, whether or not to buy.

I’ve tested several of these effects and they are simple to apply and adjust. The controls are minimal, but simplicity doesn’t mean lack of power. Naturally, whenever you compare any given effect or filter from company A versus company B, you can never definitively say which is the best one. Some of these functions, like stabilization, are also available within the host application itself. Ultimately the best results are often dependent on the individual clip. In other words, results will be better with one tool or the other, depending on the challenges presented in any given clip. Regardless, the tools are easy to use and usually provide good results.

In my testing, a couple of the CrumplePop filters proved very useful to me. EchoRemover is a solid, go-to, “fix it” filter for location and studio interviews, voice overs, and other types of dialogue. Often those recordings have a touch of “boominess” to the sound, because of the room ambience. EchoRemover did the trick on my trouble clip. The default setting was a bit heavy-handed, but after a few tweaks, I had the clean track I was looking for.

EasyStabilizer is designed to tame shaky and handheld camera footage. There are several starting parameters to choose from, such as “handheld walking”, which determine the analysis to be done on the clip. One test shot had the camera operator with a DSLR moving around a group of people at a construction site in a semi-circle, which is a tough shot to stabilize. Comparing the results to the built-in tools didn’t leave any clear winner in my mind. Both results were good, but not without some, subtle motion artifacts.

I also tested EasyTracker, which is designed for only Final Cut Pro X. I presume that’s because Premiere Pro and After Effects already both offer good tracking. Or maybe there’s something in the apps that makes this effect harder to develop. In any case, EasyTracker gives you two methods: point and planar. Point tracking is ideal for when you want to pin an object to something that moves in the frame. Planar is designed for tracking flat objects, like inserting a screen into phone or monitor. When 3D is enabled, the pinned object will scale in size as the tracked object gets larger in the frame. UPDATE: I had posted earlier that the foreground video seemed to only work with static images, like graphic logos, but that was incorrect. The good folks at CrumplePop pointed me to one of their tutorials. The trick is that you first have to make a compound clip of the foreground clip and then it works fine with a moving foreground and background image.

Like other FxFactory effects, you only buy the filter you want, without a huge investment in a large plug-in package, where many of the options might go unused. It’s nice to see FxFactory add audio filters, which expands its versatility and usefulness within the greater Final Cut Pro X (and Premiere Pro) ecosystem.

©2017 Oliver Peters

Digital Anarchy Samurai Sharpen

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Editors often face the dilemma of dealing with less-than-perfect footage. Focus is the bane of this challenge, where you have the ideal shot, but the operator missed the optimal focus, leaving a useable, albeit soft, image. Editing and compositing apps offer a number of built-in and third-party sharpen and unsharp mask filters that can be employed as a fix. While you can’t really fix the focus issue, you can sharpen the image so that it is perceived by the viewer as being better in focus. All of these filters work on the concept of localized contrast. This means that any dark-to-light edge transition within the image is enhanced and contrast in that area is increased. The dark area is darkened and the brighter part enhanced. This creates a halo effect, which can become quite visible as you increase the amount of sharpening, but also quite obnoxious when you push the amount to its full range. A little bit improves the image – a lot creates an electric, stylized effect.

One of the better sharpening filters on the market is Digital Anarchy’s Samurai Sharpen, which is available for Apple Final Cut Pro X, Adobe Premiere Pro CC and After Effects CC. (According to their website, Avid and OpenFX plug-ins are in development and coming soon.) What makes Samurai Sharpen different is that it includes sophisticated masking in order to restrict the part of the image to be sharpened. For example, on a facial close-up, you can enhance the sharpness of eyes without also pushing the skin texture by an unflattering amount. Yet, you still have plenty of control to push the image into a “look”. For example, the photographic trend these days seems to be photos with an obvious over-sharpened look for dramatic appeal. If you want subtle or if you want to stylize the image, both are achievable with Samurai Sharpen.df0717_sam_2_sm

Click any of the example images to see an enlarged view. In these comparisons, pay attention to not only the eyes, but also lips and strands of hair, as these are also affected by sharpening. (Image courtesy of Blackmagic Design.)

df0717_sam_4_smThe effect controls are divided into three groups – Sharpen, Mask and Blend. The top three sharpen controls are similar to most other filters. Amount is self-explanatory, radius adjusts the size of the localized contrast halo, and edge mask strength controls the mask that determines what is or isn’t sharpened. The edge mask strength range markings might seem counter-intuitive, though. All the way to the left (0) means that you haven’t increased the mask strength, therefore, more of the image is being sharpened. In our facial close-up example, more texture (like the skin) and noise (background) would be sharpened. If you crank the slider all the way to the right (50), you have increased the mask strength, thus less of the image is being sharpened. For the face, this means the eyes and eyelashes are sharpened, but the skin stays smooth. The handy “show sharpening” toggle renders a quick hi-con image (mask) of the area being sharpened.

df0717_sam_3_smThe real power of Samurai Sharpen is in the Mask Group. You have two controls each for shadow and highlights, as well as an on/off toggle to enable shadow and/or highlight masking. These four sliders function like a curves control, enabling you to broaden or restrict the range of dark or light portions of the image that will be affected by the sharpening. Enabling and adjusting the shadow mask controls lets you eliminate darker background portions of the image from being sharpened. You don’t want these areas sharpened, because it would result in a noisier appearance. The mask can also be blurred in order to feather the fall-off between sharpened and unprocessed portions of the image. Finally, there’s a layer mask control in this group, which shows up a bit differently between the Adobe apps and FCPX. Essentially it allows you to use another source to define your sharpening mask.

df0717_sam_5_smThe last section is the Blend Group. This offers slider adjustments for the opacity of the shadow and highlight masks created in the Mask Group section. GPU acceleration results in an effect that is quick to apply and adjust, along with good playback performance.

While there are many free sharpening tools on the market, Digital Anarchy’s Samurai Sharpen is worth the extra for the quality and control it offers. Along with Beauty Box and Flicker Free, they offer a nice repertoire of image enhancement tools.

©2017 Oliver Peters

BorisFX BCC 10

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Boris Continuum Complete (BCC) by BorisFX is the epitome of the term “Swiss Army knife” when it comes to talking about plug-ins. Most editors will pick this package over others, if they can only have one toolkit to cover a diverse range of picture enhancements. In the past year, BorisFX has upgraded this toolkit with new effects, expanded to add more NLE hosts, and integrated mocha’s Academy Award-winning planar tracking technology after the acquisition of Imagineer Systems. This set of plug-ins is now up to version BCC10. BorisFX has not only added new effects to BCC10, but also expanded its licensing options to include multi-host and subscription options.

Since many users now work with several NLEs, multi-host licensing makes a lot of sense. One purchase with a single serial number covers the installation for each of the various applications. There are two multi-host license versions: one for Avid/Adobe/Apple/OFX and the second that doesn’t include Avid. OFX licensing covers the installation for Blackmagic Design DaVinci Resolve, as well as Sony Vegas Pro for PC users.

What’s new in BCC10

df3216_bcc10_10Boris Continuum Complete version 10 includes over 230 effects within 16 different categories, like 3D Objects, Art Looks, Particles, Perspective and more. Each effect comes with numerous presets for a total of over 2,500 presets in all. There are plenty of new tools in BCC10, but the biggest news is that each effect filter integrates mocha planar tracking. BorisFX has always included Pixel Chooser as a way of masking objects. Now each filter also lets you launch the mocha interface right from inside the plug-in’s effect control panel. For example, if you are applying skin smoothing to only your talent’s forehead using the new BCC Beauty Studio, simply launch mocha, create a mask for the forehead and track the talent’s movement within the shot. The mask and track are saved within the plug-in, so you can instantly see the results.

df3216_bcc10_05A second big change is the addition and integration of the FX Browser. Each plug-in effect lets you launch the FX Browser interface to display how each of the various presets for that effect would look when applied to the selected clip. You can preview the whole clip, not just a thumbnail. FX Browser is also a standalone effect that can be applied to the clip. When you use it that way, then all presets for all filters can be previewed. While FX Browser has been implemented in past versions in some of the hosts, this is the first time that it’s become an integrated part of the BCC package across all NLEs.

df3216_bcc10_02BCC10 includes two new “studio” tools, as well as a number of new individual effects. BCC Beauty Studio is a set of tools in a single filter targeted at image retouching, especially the skin texture of talent. Photographers retouch “glamor” shots to reduce or remove blemishes, so Photoshop-style retouching is almost expected these days. This is the digital video equivalent. As with most skin smoothing filters, BCC Beauty Studio uses skin keying algorithms to isolate skin colors. It then blurs skin texture, but also lets the editor adjust contrast, color correction, and even add a subtle glow to image highlights. Of course, as I mentioned above, mocha masking and tracking is integrated for the ultimate control in where and how the effect is applied.

The second new, complex filter is BCC Title Studio. This is an integrated 3D titling tool that can be used based on templates within the effects browser or by launching the separate Title Studio interface. Editors familiar with BorisFX products will recognize this titling interface as essentially Boris RED right inside of their NLE. Not only can you create titles, but also more advanced motion graphics. You can even import objects, EPS and image files for 3D effects, including the addition of materials and shading. As with other BorisFX tilting tools, you can animate text on and off the screen.

df3216_bcc10_03In addition to these two large plug-ins, BCC10 also gained nine new filters and transitions. These include BCC Remover (fills in missing pixels or removes objects using cloning) and BCC Drop-out Fixer (restores damaged footage). For the folks who have to deal with a lot of 4×3 content and vertical cell phone footage, there’s BCC Reframer. Unlike the usual approach where the same image is stretched and blurred behind the vertical shot, this filter includes options to stylize the foreground and background.

df3216_bcc10_11The trend these days is to embrace image “defects” as a creative effect, so two of the new filters are BCC Light Leaks and BCC Video Glitch. Each adds organic, distressed effects, like in-camera light contamination and corrupted digital video artifacts. To go along with this, there are also four new transitions, including a BCC Light Leaks Dissolve, Cross Glitch, Cross Zoom and Cross Melt. Of these, the light leaks, glitch and zoom transitions are about what you’d expect from the name, however, the melt transition seems rather unique. In addition to the underlying dissolve between two images, there are a variety of effects options that can be applied as part of this transition. Many of these are glass, plastic, prism or streak effects, which add an interesting twist to this style of transition.

In use

df3216_bcc10_04The new BCC10 package works within the established hosts much like it always has, so no surprises there. The Boris Continuum Complete package used to come bundled with Avid Media Composer, but unfortunately that’s no longer the case. Avid editors who want the full BCC set have to purchase it. As with most plug-ins, After Effects is generally the best host when adjustment and manipulation of effects are required.

df3216_bcc10_09A new NLE to consider is DaVinci Resolve. Many are testing the waters to see if Resolve could become their NLE of choice. Blackmagic Design introduced Resolve 12.5 with even more focus on its editing toolset, including new, built-in effect filters and transitions. In my testing, BCC10 works reasonably well with Resolve 12.5 once you get used to where the effects are. Resolve uses a modal design with editing and color correction split into separate modes or pages. BCC10 transition effects only show up in the OFX library of the edit page. For filter effects, which are applied to the whole clip, you have to go to the color page. During the color correction process you may add any filter effect, but it has to be applied to a node. If you apply more than one filter, you have to add a new node for each filter. With the initial release of BCC10, mocha did not work within Resolve. If you tried to launch it, a message came up that this functionality would be added at a later time. In May, BorisFX released BCC10.2, which included mocha for both Resolve 12.5 and Vegas Pro. To use the BCC10 effects with Resolve 12.5 you need the paid Studio version and not the free version of Resolve.

df3216_bcc10_07BorisFX BCC10 is definitely a solid update, with new features, mocha integration and better GPU-based performance. It runs best in After Effects CC, Premiere Pro CC and Avid Media Composer. The built-in effects tools are pretty good in After Effects, Final Cut Pro X and Resolve 12.5 – meaning you might get by without needing what BCC10 has to offer. On the other hand, they are unfortunately very mediocre in Premiere Pro or Media Composer. If one of those is your editing axe, then BCC10 becomes an essential purchase, if you want to improve the capabilities of your editing application. Regardless of which tool you use, BCC10 will give you more options to stretch your creativity.

df3216_bcc10_08On a related note, at IBC 2016 in Amsterdam, BorisFX announced the acquisition of GenArts. This means that the Sapphire effects are now housed under the BorisFX umbrella, which could make for some interesting bundling options in the future. As with their integration of mocha tracking into the BCC effects, future versions of BCC and/or Sapphire might also see a sharing of compatible technologies across these two effects families. Stay tuned.

Originally written for Digital Video magazine / Creative Planet Network

©2016 Oliver Peters

Adobe Premiere Pro CC Learning Tips

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Adobe Premiere Pro CC is the heir apparent editing application for many editors. In order to make your transition easier, I’ve compiled a series of links to various official and unofficial resources, including Adobe sites, forums, YouTube videos, training resources, and various blog posts. This list is by no means all that’s out there, but it should provide a great starting point to become more comfortable with Premiere Pro CC.

Adobe and Adobe-related training resources

Adobe tutorials

Adobe Premiere Pro tips

Maxim Jago’s tips at Lynda

Maxim Jago’s tips at Peachpit

Lynda’s Adobe Premiere Pro training

Ripple Training – Premiere Pro CC 2015

Adobe-related blogs and YouTube channels

Dave Helmly’s DAV Tech Table

Jason Levine’s YouTube channel

Colin Smith’s YouTube channel

Dave Helmly’s presentation at Orlando Post Pros meeting – 2015 (webcast)

Forums

Adobe Filmmaker stories

Adobe Premiere Pro Forum

Creative COW Premiere Pro forum

Premiere-centric sites and YouTube channels

Jarle Leirpoll’s Premiere Pro blog

Retooled

Premiere Bro

Best Premiere Pro Quick Tips YouTube Channel

Premiere Pro Tips YouTube channel

Blog posts

VashiVisuals – Deadpool Premiere Pro Presets

VashiVisuals – Keyboard Layouts

VashiVisuals – Music Video Editing Tips

VashiVisuals – Pancake Timeline

Jonny Elwyn – Premiere posts

Jonny Elwyn – Premiere Pro Tools and Tutorials

Jonny Elwyn – Tips and Tricks

Jonny Elwyn – Tips for Better Editing in Premiere Pro

Jonny Elwyn – Tutorials for Better Editing in Premiere Pro

Premium Beat – Beginner’s Guide to Premiere Pro Shortcuts

Premium Beat – Match Frame and Replace Edit

Premium Beat – How to Clean up Audio in Premiere Pro

Premium Beat – Creating a Storyboard Edit in Premiere Pro

Premium Beat – AVCHD Editing Workflow

Premium Beat – How to Organize a Feature Film Edit

Premium Beat – 3 Quick Tips for Editing in Premiere Pro

Premium Beat – Time-Saving Premiere Pro CC Tips

Derek Lieu – Simple Tricks for Faster Editing in Premiere Pro

No Film School – Premiere Pro Keyboard Shortcuts

Wipster – 4 Reasons Why Premiere Pro is a Great Choice

Wipster – Master the Media Browser

Plug-ins, add-ons, other

Kinetic type and layer effects by TypeMonkey for After Effects

Post Notes Premiere Pro control panel

PDFviewer Premiere Pro control panel

Frame.io integration

Wipster.io integration

Axle Video integration

LookLabs SpeedLooks

FxFactory plug-ins

RedGiant Software plug-ins

Boris FX plug-ins

DigitalFilms – SpeedGrade Looks

Jarle’s Premiere Pro Presets

Note : this information is also included on the Editing Resources page accessible from the header of this blog. Future updates will be made there.

©2016 Oliver Peters

Automatic Duck Xsend Motion

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When Apple transitioned its Final Cut Pro product family from Final Cut Studio to Final Cut Pro X, Motion 5, and Compressor 4, it lost a number of features that editors really liked. Some of these “missing” features show up as consistent and reoccurring requests on various wish lists. One of the most popular is the roundtrip function that sent Final Cut Pro “classic” timelines over to Motion for further compositing. To many, it seemed like Motion had become relegated to being a fancy development tool for FCPX plug-ins, rather than what it is – a powerful, GPU-enabled compositor.

df1516_AD_2At last, that workflow hole has been plugged, thanks to Automatic Duck. Last year the father/son development team brought us a way to go from Final Cut Pro X to Adobe’s After Effects by way of the Automatic Duck Ximport AE bridge. This week at the FCP Exchange Workshop in Las Vegas, Wes Plate reveals the new Automatic Duck Xsend Motion. This tool leverages the power of the FCPX’s version of XML to move data from one application to the other. Thanks to FCPXML, it provides a bridge to send FCPX timelines, clips, or sections of timelines over to Motion 5.

df1516_AD_4Xsend Motion reads FCPXML exports or is able to process projects directly from the Final Cut Pro X Share menu. The Xsend menu enables a number of settings options, including whether to bring clips into Motion as individual clips or as what Automatic Duck has dubbed as “lanes”. When clips are left individual, then each clip is assigned a layer in Motion for a composition made up of a series of cascading layers. If you opt for lanes, then the Motion layers stay grouped in a similar representation to the FCPX project timeline. This way primary and secondary storylines and connected clips are properly configured. Xsend also interprets compound clips.

Automatic Duck is striving to correctly interpret all of the FCPX characteristics, including frame sizes, rates, cropping, and more. Since Final Cut Pro X and Motion 5 are essentially built upon the same engine, the translation will correctly interpret most built-in effects. However, it may or may not interpret custom Motion templates that individual users have created. In addition, they plan on being able to properly translate many of the effects in the FxFactory portfolio, which typically install into both FCPX and Motion.

df1516_AD_3While Xsend Motion and Ximport AE are primarily one-way trips, there is a mechanism to send the finished result back to Final Cut Pro X from Motion 5. The first and most obvious is simply to render the Motion composition as a flattened QuickTime movie and import that back into FCPX as new media. However, you can also publish the Motion composition as an FCPX Generator. This would then show up in the Generators portion of the Effects Palette as a custom generator effect.

Automatic Duck Xsend Motion will be officially released later this year. The price hasn’t been announced yet. Current Automatic Duck products (Automatic Duck Ximport AE and Automatic Duck Media Copy) are available through Red Giant.

©2016 Oliver Peters

Spring Tools

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It’s often the little things that improve your editing workflow. Here are a few quick items that can expand your editing arsenal.

Hawaiki Super Dissolve

df1416_tools_3The classical approach to editing transitions suggests that all you need is a cut and a dissolve. Given how often most editors use a dissolve transition, it’s amazing that few NLE developers spend any time creating more than a basic video dissolve, fade or dip. After all, even the original Media Composer came with both a video and a film-style dissolve. Audio mixers are used to several different types of crossfades.

Since this is such a neglected area, the development team behind the Hawaiki plug-ins decided to create Super Dissolve – a dissolve transition plug-in for Final Cut Pro X with many more options. This installs through the FxFactory application. It shows up in the FCPX transitions palette as a dissolve effect, plus a set of presets for fades, dips and custom curves. A dissolve is nothing more than a blend between two images, so Super Dissolve exposes the same types of under-the-hood controls as After Effects and Photoshop artists are used to with compositing modes.

Drop the Super Dissolve in as a transition and you have control over blending modes, layer order, easing controls with timing, and the blurring of the outgoing and/or incoming image. Since you have control over the outgoing and incoming clips separately, different values can be applied to either side, thus enabling an asymmetrical effect. For example, a quick fade with a blur off the outgoing clip, while bringing the incoming side up more slowly. As with the default FCPX dissolve, there’s also an audio crossfade adjustment, since FCPX transitions can effect both audio and video when these elements are combined. If you really like the ability to finesse your transitions, then Super Dissolve hits the spot.

XEffects Audio Fades

df1416_tools_6Free is good, so check out Idustrial Revolution’s free effects. Although they are primarily a video effects developer for Motion and Final Cut Pro X, they recently added a set of audio fade presets for FCPX. Download and install the free pack and you’ll find the XEffects Fades group in the audio plug-ins section of your effects palette.

XEffects Fades includes a set of preset fade handles, which are applied to the audio on your timeline clips. Drag-and-drop the preset with the fade length closest to what you want and it automatically adjusts the fade handle length at both ends of that audio clip. If you want to tweak the length, apply the effect first and then adjust the length puck on the clip as needed. Existing lengths will be overwritten when you drop the effect onto the clip, so make sure you make these adjustments last.

AudioDenoise and EchoRemover

df1416_tools_5CrumplePop is another developer known for its video effects; but they, too have decided to add audio effects to their repertoire. AudioDenoise and EchoRemover are two Final Cut Pro X plug-ins sold through the FxFactory application. These two effects are easy-to-use Apple Audio Units filters designed to improve poorly recorded location audio. As with Apple’s own built-in controls, each filter includes a few sliders to adjust strength and how the effect is applied. When applying any audio “clean up” filter, a little goes a long way. If you use it to its extreme range, the result sounds like you are underwater. Nevertheless, these two filters do a very nice job with poor audio, without presenting the cost and complexity of other well-known audio products.

Alex4D Animated Transitions

df1416_tools_1For a little bit of spice in your Final Cut Pro X timelines, it’s worth checking out the Alex4D Animated Transitions from FxFactory. Alex Gollner has been a prolific developer of free Final Cut Pro plug-ins, but this is his first commercial effort. Animated Transitions are a set of 120 customizable transition effects to slide, grow, split and peel incoming or outgoing clips and lower third titles. Traditionally you’d have to build these effects yourself using DVE moves. But by dropping one of these effects onto a cut point between two clips, you quickly apply a dynamic effect with all the work already done. Simply pick the transition you like, tweak the parameters and it’s done.

Post Notes

df1416_tools_4One of the best features of Adobe applications is Extensions. This is a development “hook” within Premiere Pro or After Effects that allows developers to create task-oriented panels, tools and controls that effectively “bolt” right into the Adobe interface. One example for After Effects would be TypeMonkey (and the other “Monkeys”), which are kinetic effect macros. For Premiere there’s PDFviewer, which enables you to view your script (or any other document) in PDF format right inside the Premiere user interface.

A new extension for Premiere Pro CC is Post Notes. Once installed, it’s an interface panel within Premiere Pro that functions as a combined notepad and to-do list. These are tied to a specific sequence, so you can have a set of notes and to-dos for each sequence in your project. When a to-do item is completed, check it off to indicate that it’s been addressed. This tool is so straightforward and simple, you’ll wonder why every editing software doesn’t already have something like this built-in.

Hedge for Mac

df1416_tools_2With digital media as a way of life for most editors, we have to deal with more and more camera media. Quickly copying camera cards is a necessary evil and making sure you do this without corruption is essential. The Mac Finder really is NOT the tool you should be using, yet everyone does it. There are a number of products on the market that copy to multiple locations with checksum verification. These are popular with DITs and “data wranglers” and include Pomfort Silverstack, Red Giant Offload, and even Adobe Prelude.

A newcomer is Hedge for Mac. This is a simple, single-purpose utility designed to quickly copy files and verify the copies. There’s a free and a paid version. If you just want to copy to one or two destinations at a time, the free version will do. If you need even more destinations as a simultaneous copy, then go for the paid version. Hedge will also launch your custom AppleScripts to sort, transcode, rename or perform other functions. Transfers are fast in the testing I’ve done, so this is a must-have tool for any editors.

©2016 Oliver Peters

More LUTs from IWLTBAP

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With more cameras shooting in some form of a log or flat color profile and more editing software being able to integrate color look-up tables (LUTs), numerous developers have designed their own LUT packages. Some, like Koji, strive to duplicate the colorimetry of certain film stocks, while others, such as SpeedLooks from LookLabs, create stylized “look” files that give you a range of creative color correction choices.

One new developer offering a package of easy to use LUTs is French filmmaker IWLTBAP. Through the website, you can pick up a comprehensive package of LUTs in the 32x32x32 .cube format, which are compatible with most modern editing and compositing software applications. If you edit in Adobe Premiere Pro CC, the Lumetri Color panel lets you browse and add any .cube LUTs you’ve saved on your hard drives. If you cut in Apple Final Cut Pro X, then the addition of a LUT plug-in, like Color Grading Central’s LUT Utility, enables you to add third-party LUTs to any clip on the timeline.df1316_iwltbap_4

I took these LUTs for a spin and like most LUT packages, they come in a groups. First you have Utility LUTs, which are designed to convert color spaces from log to Rec709 (the standard video color space) or in the opposite direction. These are organized by camera type, since not all manufacturers use the same logarithmic values. Then the color correction or “look” LUTs are grouped into Standard and Log versions.

The Standard LUTs are to be applied to images that are already in Rec709 color space, while the Log versions can be used as a one-step LUT to be applied to generic log images. For example, you could apply both a Log-to-Rec709 Utility LUT and a second LUT from the Standard group to achieve your result. Or simply apply the single Log version to that same clip and end up with similar results. The dual-LUT approach gives you more incremental control over the Log conversion based on camera models, whereas the single-step solution is designed for generic log images. However, both can yield the desired grade, depending on the clip. In addition to the paid LUT package, IWLTBAP offers two Bonus LUTs, which are available as a free download from the website.

df1316_iwltbap_2There are over 80 LUTs in each group and these are organized by color style and number. The numbers don’t really mean anything. In other words, they aren’t an attempt to mimic a film stock number. As you ascend in numbers, the next step is a more aggressive or somewhat different version of the previous. The key is the prefix and suffix for each. These LUT files carry a STD or LOG suffix so you know whether these are from the Log or Standard group. Then there’s a prefix: C for cold, H for hot, W for warm, F for film, and X for creative. Each style has several variations within that general look. For example, the LUT file labelled “F-9490-STD.cube” is a LUT with a filmic curve designed for a Rec709 image.

df1316_iwltbap_7When working with LUTs, it’s often hard to know what result you get until you try it. Then if you don’t like the look, you have to continue to slowly browse through your LUT files – applying each, one at a time – until you get the right look. Often that can lead to a lot of trial and error. The IWLTBAP package ships with lightweight Windows and Mac preview applications, however, the developer warns of some occasional instability on some machines. The easiest solution is to use their web-based LUT previewer. Simply upload a reference JPEG from your clip and then toggle through the LUTs to preview how those will affect the shot.

df1316_iwltbap_6I ran some tests on Blackmagic Design camera footage in both FCPX and Premiere Pro CC and got some really pleasing results. In the case of FCPX, if you use LUT Utility, you have to copy the .cube files into LUT Utility’s Motion Templates folder. This is found under Effects/CGC. Files stored there become visible in the LUT Utility pulldown menu. Note that only the first 50 or so files in that folder can be accessed, so be selective. If you apply two instances of the LUT Utility to a clip, then you can apply a Log-to-Rec709 conversion in the first and then the creative look LUT in the second. This plug-in has a mix slider, so you can adjust the intensity of the LUT to taste. As an effects plug-in, you can also place other effects, such as color correction in-between the two LUT Utility effects as part of that stack of effects. Doing this gives you nice control over color within FCPX with very little overhead on the application’s performance.

df1316_iwltbap_3If you are an FCPX user that has adopted Color Grading Central’s ColorFinale grading tool as your go-to color correction plug-in, then all of this LUT management within the application can be simply handled from the ColorFinale interface itself. Stack layers of LUTs and other color tools all inside the ColorFinale panel. LUT choices can be added or removed using the integrated LUT Manager and then relaunching FCPX to activate them as part of ColorFinale.

If you are a Premiere Pro CC editor, then the latest version was enhanced with the Lumetri Color panel. This control is organized as a stack of color modules, which include two entry points to add a LUT – in the Basic and the Creative tabs. In my testing of the new URSA footage, I applied a Log-to-Rec709 LUT for the URSA in Basic and then one the “look” LUTs, like the free Aspen standard version, in Creative. You still have all the other color control in the Lumetri panel to fine-tune these, including the intensity level of the LUT.

df1316_iwltbap_5LUTs are a creative tool that should be thought of as a stylistic choice. They aren’t an instant fix and shouldn’t be the only tool you use to color correct a clip. However, the LUTs from IWLTBAP provide a good selection of looks and moods that work well with a wide range of shots. Plus the package is very affordable and even more so if you get it after reading this blog! Readers who are interested can get 25% off of the retail price using the discount code DIGITALFILMS. Or by using this direct link.

Last but not least, check out the free, downloadable 4K film grain clip. It’s a ten second ProRes file that can be overlaid or blended to add grain to your shot.

©2016 Oliver Peters