Accusonus ERA4

It’s fair to say that most video editors, podcast producers, and audio enthusiasts don’t possess the level of intimate understanding of audio filters that a seasoned recording engineer does. Yet each still has the need to present the cleanest, most professional-sounding audio as part of their productions. Some software developers have sought to serve this market with plug-ins that combine the controls into a single knob or slider. The first of these was Waves Audio with their OneKnob series. Another company using the single-knob approach is a relative newcomer, Accusonus.

I first became aware of Accusonus through Avid. Media Composer license owners have been offered loyalty add-ons, such as plug-ins, which recently included the Accusonus ERA3 Voice Leveler plug-in. I found this to be a very useful tool and so when Accusonus offered to send the new ERA4 Bundle for my evaluation, I was more than happy to give the rest of the package a test run. ERA4 was released at the end of June in a Standard and Pro bundle along with discounted, introductory pricing, available until the end of July. You may also purchase each of these filters individually.

Audio plug-ins typically come in one of four formats: AU (Mac only), VST (Mac or Windows), VST3 (Mac or Windows), and AAX (for Avid Media Composer and Pro Tools). When you purchase audio filters, they don’t necessarily come in all flavors. Sometimes, plug-ins will be AU and VST/VST3, but leave out AAX. Or will only be for AAX. Or only AU. Accusonic plug-ins are installed as all four types on a Mac, which means that a single purchase covers most common DAWs and NLEs (check their site for supported hosts). For example, my Macs include Final Cut Pro X, Logic Pro X, Audition, Premiere Pro, and Media Composer. The ERA4 plug-ins work in all of these.

I ran into some issues with Resolve. The plug-ins worked fine on the Fairlight page of Resolve 16 Studio Beta. That’s on my home machine. However, the Macs at work are running the Mac App Store version of Resolve 15 Studio. There, only the VST versions could be applied and I had to re-enter each filter’s activation code and relaunch. I would conclude from this that Resolve is fine as a host, although there may be some conflicts in the Mac App Store version. That’s likely due to some differences between it and the software you download directly from Blackmagic Design.

Another benefit is that Accusonus permits each license key to be used on up to three machines. If a user has both a laptop and a desktop computer, the plug-in can be installed and activated on each without the need to swap authorizations through an online license server or move an iLok dongle between machines. The ERA4 installers include all of the tools in the bundle, even if you only purchased one. You can ignore the others, uninstall them, or test them out in a trial mode. The complete bundle is available and fully functional for a 14-day free trial.

ERA4 Bundles

I mentioned the Waves One Knob filters at the top, but there’s actually little overlap between these two offerings. The One Knob series is focused on EQ and compression tasks, whereas the ERA4 effects are designed for audio repair. As such, they fill a similar need as the iZotope’s RX series.

The ERA4 Standard bundle includes six audio plug-ins: Noise, Reverb, and Plosive Removers, De-Esser, De-Clipper, and the Voice Leveler. The Pro bundle adds two more: the more comprehensive De-Esser Pro and ERA-D, which is a combined noise and reverb filter for more advanced processing than the two individual filters. If you primarily work with well-recorded studio voice-overs or location dialogue, then most likely the Standard bundle will be all you need. However, the two extra filters in the Pro bundle come in handy with more problematic audio. Even productions with high values occasionally get stuck with recordings done in challenging environments and last-minute VOs done on iPhones. It’s certainly worth checking out the full package as a trial.

While Accusonus does use a single-control approach, but it’s a bit simplistic to say that you are tied to only one control knob. Some of the plug-ins do offer more depth so you can tailor your settings.  For instance, the Noise Remover filter offers five preset curves to determine the frequencies that are affected. Each filter includes additional controls for the task at hand.

In use

Accusonus ERA4 filters are designed to be easy to use and work well in real-time. When all I need to do is improve audio that isn’t a basket case, then the ERA filters at their default settings do a wonderful job. For example, a VO recording might require a combination of Voice Leveler (smooth out dynamics), De-Esser (reduce sibilance), and Plosive Remover (clean up popping “p” sounds). Using the default control level (40%) or even backing off a little improved the sound.

It was the more problematic audio where ERA4 was good, but not necessarily always the best tool. In one case I tested a very, heavily clipped VO recording. When I used ERA4 De-Clipper in Final Cut Pro X, I was able to get similar results to the same tool from iZotope RX6. However, doing the same comparison in Audition yielded different results. Audition is designed to preview an effect and then apply it. The RX plug-in at its extreme setting crackled in real-time playback, but yielded superior results compared with the ERA4 De-Clipper after the effect was applied (rendered). Unfortunately FCPX has no equivalent “apply,” “render and replace,” or audio bounce function, so audio has to stay real-time, which gives Accusonus a performance edge in FCPX. For most standard audio repair tasks, Accusonus’ plug-ins were equal or better than most other options, especially those built into the host application.

I started out talking about the Voice Leveler plug-in, because that’s an audio function I perform often, especially with voice-overs. It helps to make the VO stand out in the mix against music and sound effects. This is an intelligent compressor, which means it tries to bring up all audio and then compress peaks over a threshold. But learn the controls before diving in. For example, it includes a breath control. Engaging this will prevent the audio from pumping up in volume each time the announcer takes a breath. As with all of the ERA4 filters, there is a small, scrolling waveform in the plug-in’s control panel. Areas that were adjusted by the filter are highlighted, so you can see when it is active.

Voice Leveler is a good VO tool, but that type is one of the more subjective audio filters. Some editors or audio engineers compress, some limit, and others prefer to adjust levels only manually. My all-time favorite is Wave’s Vocal Rider. Unlike a compressor, it dynamically raises and lowers audio levels between two target points. To my ears, this method yields a more open sound than heavy compression. But when its normal MSRP is pretty expensive. I also like the Logic Pro X Compressor, which is available in Final Cut Pro X. It mimics various vintage compressors, like Focusrite Red or the DBX 160X. I feel that it’s one of the nicest sounding compressors, but is only available in the Apple pro apps. Adobe users – you are out of luck on that one.

From my point-of-view, the more tools the better. You never know when you might need one. The Accusonus ERA4 bundle offers a great toolset for anyone who has to turn around a good-sounding mix quickly. Each bundle is easy to install and activate and even easier to use. Operation is real-time, even when you stack several together. Accusonus’ current introductory price for the bundles is about what some individual plug-ins cost from competing companies, plus the 14-day trial is a great way to check them out. If you need to build up your audio toolbox, this is a solid set to start out with.

Check out Accusonus’ blog for tips on using the ERA plug-ins.

©2019 Oliver Peters

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CoreMelt PaintX

When Apple launched Final Cut Pro X, it was with a decidedly simplified set of video effects. This was enhanced by the easy ability for users to create their own custom effects, using Apple Motion as a development platform. The result has been an entirely new ecosystem of low-cost, high-quality video effects. As attractive as that is, truly advanced visual effects still require knowledgeable plug-in developers who are able to work within the FCPX and macOS architecture in order to produce more powerful tools. For example, other built-in visual effects tools, such as Avid Media Composer’s Intraframe Paint or the Fusion page in DaVinci Resolve, simply aren’t within the scope of FCPX, nor what users can create on their own through Motion templates.

To fill that need, developers like CoreMelt have been designing a range of advanced visual effects tools for the Final Cut Pro market, including effects for tracking, color correction, stabilization, and more. Their newest release is PaintX, which adds a set of Photoshop-style tools to Final Cut Pro X. As with many of CoreMelt’s other offerings, PaintX includes planar tracking, thanks to the licensing of Mocha tracking technology.

To start, drop the PaintX effect onto a clip and then launch the custom interface. PaintX requires a better control layout than the standard FCPX user interface has been designed for. Once inside the PaintX interface window, you have a choice of ten brush functions, including paint color, change color, blur, smear, sharpen, warp, clone, add noise, heal, and erase. These functions cover a range of needs, from simple wire removal to beauty enhancements and even pseudo horror makeup effects. You have control over brush size, softness, aspect ratio, angle, and opacity. The various brushes also have specific controls for their related functions, such as the blur range for the blur brush. Effects are applied in layers and actions. Each stroke is an action and both remain editable. If you aren’t the most precise artist, then the erase brush comes in handy. Did you color a bit too far outside of the lines? Simply use the erase brush on that layer and trim back your excess.

Multiple brush effects can be applied to the same or different areas within the image, simply by adding a new layer for each effect. Once you’ve applied the first paint stroke, an additional brush control panel opens – allowing you to edit the brush parameters, after the fact. So, if your brush size was too large or not soft enough, simply alter those settings without the need to redo the effect. Each effect can be individually tracked in either direction. The Mocha tracker offers additional features, such as transform (scale/position) versus perspective tracking, along with the ability to copy and paste tracking data between brush layers.

As a Final Cut Pro X effect, PaintX works within the standard video pipeline. If you applied color correction upstream of your PaintX filter, then that grade is visible within the PaintX interface. But if the color correction is applied downstream of the PaintX effect, you won’t see it when you open the PaintX interface. However, that correction will still be uniformly applied to the clip, including the areas altered within the PaintX effect. If you’ve “punched into” a 4K clip on an HD timeline, when you open PaintX, you’ll still see the full 4K frame. Finally, you have additional FCPX control over the opacity and mix of the applied PaintX filter.

I found PaintX to be well-behaved even on a modest Mac, like my 3-year-old laptop. However, if you don’t have a beefy Mac, keep the effect simple. The more brush effects that you apply and track in a single clip, the slower the real-time response will become, especially on under-powered machines. These effects are GPU-intensive and paint strokes are really a particle system; therefore, simple, single-layer effects are the easiest on the machine. But, if you intend to do more complex effects like blurs and sharpens in multiple layers, then you will really want one of the more powerful Macs. Playback response is generally better, once you’ve saved the effect and exit back to Final Cut. I did run into one minor issue with the clone brush on a single isolated clip, while using a 2013 Mac Pro. CoreMelt told me there have been a few early bugs with certain GPUs and is looking into the anomaly I discovered. That model in particular has been notorious for GPU issues with video effects. (Update: CoreMelt sent me a new build, which has corrected this problem.)

Originally written for RedShark News

©2018 Oliver Peters

Audio Mixing with Premiere Pro

When budgets permit and project needs dictate, I will send my mixes out-of-house to one of a few regular mixers. Typically that means sending them an OMF or AAF to mix in Pro Tools. Then I get the mix and split-tracks back, drop them into my Premiere Pro timeline, and generate master files.

On the other hand, a lot of my work is cutting simple commercials and corporate presentations for in-house use or the web, and these are often less demanding  – 2 to 8 tracks of dialogue, limited sound effects, and music. It’s easy to do the mix inside of the NLE. Bear in mind that I can – and often have – done such a mix in Apple Logic Pro X or Adobe Audition, but the tools inside Premiere Pro are solid enough that I often just keep everything – mix included – inside my editing application. Let’s walk though that process.

Dealing with multiple channels on source clips

Start with your camera files or double-system audio recordings. Depending on the camera model, Premiere Pro will see these source clips as having either stereo (e.g. a Canon C100) or multi-channel mono (e.g. ARRI Alexa) channels. If you recorded a boom mic on channel 1 and a lavaliere mic on channel 2, then these will drop onto your stereo timeline either as two separate mono tracks (Alexa) – or as a single stereo track (C100), with the boom coming out of the left speaker and the lav out of the right. Which one it is will strictly depend on the device used to generate the original recordings.

First, when dual-mic recordings appear as stereo, you have to understand how Premiere Pro deals with stereo sources. Panning in Premiere Pro doesn’t “shift” the audio left, right, or center. Instead, it increases or decreases the relative volume of the left or right half of this stereo field. In our dual-mic scenario, panning the clip or track full left means that we only hear the boom coming out of the left speaker, but nothing out of the right. There are two ways to fix this – either by changing the channel configuration of the source in the browser – or by changing it after the fact in the timeline. Browser changes will not alter the configuration of clips already edited to the timeline. You can change one or more source clips from stereo to dual-mono in the browser, but you can’t make that same type of change to a clip already in your sequence.

Let’s assume that you aren’t going to make any browser changes and instead just want to work in your sequence. If your source clip is treated as dual-mono, then the boom and lav will cut over to track 1 and 2 of your sequence – and the sound will be summed in mono on the output to your speaks. However, if the clip is treated as stereo, then it will only cut over to track 1 of your sequence – and the sound will stay left and right on the output to your speakers. When it’s dual-mono, you can listen to one track versus the other, determine which mic sounds the best, and disable the clip with the other mic. Or you can blend the two using clip volume levels.

If the source clip ends up in the sequence as a stereo clip, then you will want to determine which one of the two mics you want to use for the best sound. To pick only one mic, you will need to change the clip’s audio configuration. When you do that, it’s still a stereo clip, however, both “sides” can be supplied by either one of the two source channels. So, both left and right output will either be the boom or the lav, but not both. If you want to blend both mics together, then you will need to duplicate (option-drag) the audio clip onto an adjacent timeline track, and change the audio channel configuration for both clips. One would be set to the boom for both channels and the other set to only the lav for its two channels. Then adjust clip volume for the two timeline clips.

Configuring your timeline

Like most editors, while I’m working through the stages of rough cutting on the way to an approved final copy, I will have a somewhat messy timeline. I may have multiple music cues on several tracks with only one enabled – just so I can preview alternates for the client. I will have multiple dialogue clips on a few tracks with some disabled, depending on microphone or take options. But when I’m ready to move to the finishing stage, I will duplicate that sequence to create a “final version” and clean that one up. This means getting rid of any disabled clips, collapsing my audio and video clips to the fewest number of tracks, and using Premiere’s track creation/deletion feature to delete all empty tracks – all so I can have the least amount of visual clutter. 

In other blog posts, I’ve discussed working with additional submix buses to create split-track exports; but, for most of these smaller jobs, I will only add one submix bus. (I will explain its purpose in a moment.) Once created, you will need to open the track mixer panel and route the timeline channels from the master to the submix bus and then the output of the submix bus back to the master.

Plug-ins

Premiere Pro CC comes with a nice set of audio plug-ins, which can be augmented with plenty of third-party audio effects filters. I am partial to Waves and iZotope, but these aren’t essential. However, there are several that I do use quite frequently. These three third-party filters will help improve any vocal-heavy piece.

The first two are Vocal Rider and MV2 from Waves and are designed specifically for vocal performances, like voice-overs and interviews. These can be pricey, but Waves has frequent sales, so I was able to pick these up for a fraction of their retail price. Vocal Rider is a real-time, automatic volume adjustment tool. Set the bottom and top parameters and let Vocal Rider do the rest, by automatically pushing the volume up or down on-the-fly. MV2 is similar, but it achieves this through compression on the top and bottom ends of the range. While they operate in a similar fashion, they do produce a different sound. I tend to pick MV2 for voice-overs and Vocal Rider for interviews.

We all know location audio isn’t perfect, which is where my third filter comes in. FxFactory is knows primarily for video plug-ins, but their partnership with Crumplepop has added a nice set of audio filters to their catalog. I find AudioDenoise to be quite helpful and fast in fixing annoying location sounds, like background air conditioning noise. It’s real-time and good-sounding, but like all audio noise reduction, you have to be careful not to overdo it, or everything will sound like it’s underwater.

For my other mix needs, I’ll stick to Premiere’s built-in effects, like EQ, compressors, etc. One that’s useful for music is the stereo imager. If you have a music cue that sounds too monaural, this will let you “expand” the track’s stereo signal so that it is spread more left and right. This often helps when you want the voice-over to cut through the mix a bit better. 

My last plug-in is a broadcast limiter that is placed onto the master bus. I will adjust this tight with a hard limit for broadcast delivery, but much higher (louder allowed) for web files. Be aware that Premiere’s plug-in architecture allows you to have the filter take affect either pre or post-fader. In the case of the master bus, this will also affect the VU display. In other words, if you place a limiter post-fader, then the result will be heard, but not visible through the levels displayed on the VU meters.

Mixing

I have used different mixing strategies over the years with Premiere Pro. I like using the write function of the track mixer to write fader automation. However, I have lately stopped using it – instead going back to manual keyframes within the clips. The reason is probably that my projects tend to get revised often in ways that change timing. Since track automation is based on absolute timeline position, keyframes don’t move when a clip is shifted, like they would when clip-based volume keyframes are used.

Likewise, Adobe has recently added Audition’s ducking for music to Premiere Pro. This uses Adobe’s Sensei artificial intelligence. Unfortunately I don’t find to be “intelligent” enough. Although sometimes it can provide a starting point. For me, it’s simply too coarse and doesn’t intelligently adjust for areas within a music clip that swell or change volume internally. Therefore, I stick with minor manual adjustments to compensate for music changes and to make the vocal parts easy to understand in the mix. Then I will use the track mixer to set overall levels for each track to get the right balance of voice, sound effects, and music.

Once I have a decent balance to my ears, I will temporarily drop the TC Electronic (included with Premiere Pro) Radar loudness plug-in to make sure my mix is CALM-compliant. This is where the submix bus comes in. If I like the overall balance, but I need to bring everything down, it’s an easy matter to simply lower the submix level and remeasure.

Likewise, it’s customary to deliver web versions with louder volume levels than the broadcast mix. Again the submix bus will help, because you cannot raise the volume on the master – only lower it. If you simply want to raise the overall volume of the broadcast mix for web delivery, simply raise the submix fader. Note that when I say louder, I’m NOT talking about slamming the VUs all the way to the top. Typically, a mix that hits -6 is plenty loud for the web. So, for web delivery, I will set a hard limit at -6, but adjust the mix for an average of about -10.

Hopefully this short explanation has provided some insight into mixing within Premiere Pro and will help you make sure that your next project sounds great.

©2018 Oliver Peters

Stocking Stuffers 2017

It’s holiday time once again. For many editors that means it’s time to gift themselves with some new tools and toys to speed their workflows or just make the coming year more fun! Here are some products to consider.

Just like the tiny house craze, many editors are opting for their laptops as their main editing tool. I’ve done it for work that I cut when I’m not freelancing in other shops, simply because my MacBook Pro is a better machine than my old (but still reliable) 2009 Mac Pro tower. One less machine to deal with, which simplifies life. But to really make it feel like a desktop tool, you need some accessories along with an external display. For me, that boils down to a dock, a stand, and an audio interface. There are several stands for laptops. I bought both the Twelve South BookArc and the Rain Design mStand: the BookArc for when I just want to tuck the closed MacBook Pro out of the way in the clamshell mode and the mStand for when I need to use the laptop’s screen as a second display. Another option some editors like is the Vertical Dock from Henge Docks, which not only holds the MacBook Pro, but also offers some cable management.

The next hardware add-on for me is a USB audio interface. This is useful for any type of computer and may be used with or without other interfaces from Blackmagic Design or AJA. The simplest of these is the Mackie Onyx Blackjack, which combines interface and output monitor mixing into one package. This means no extra small mixer is required. USB input and analog audio output direct to a pair of powered speakers. But if you prefer a separate small mixer and only want a USB interface for input/output, then the PreSonus Audiobox USB or the Focusrite Scarlett series is the way to go.

Another ‘must have’ with any modern system is a Thunderbolt dock in order to expand the native port connectivity of your computer. There are several on the market but it’s hard to go wrong with either the CalDigit Thunderbolt Station 2 or the OWC Thunderbolt 2 Dock. Make sure you double-check which version fits for your needs, depending on whether you have a Thunderbolt 2 or 3 connection and/or USB-C ports. I routinely use each of the CalDigit and OWC products. The choice simply depends on which one has the right combination of ports to fit your needs.

Drives are another issue. With a small system, you want small portable drives. While LaCie Rugged and G-Technology portable drives are popular choices, SSDs are the way to go when you need true, fast performance. A number of editors I’ve spoken to are partial to the Samsung Portable SSD T5 drives. These USB3.0-compatible drives aren’t the cheapest, but they are ultraportable and offer amazing read/write speeds. Another popular solution is to use raw (uncased) drives in a drive caddy/dock for archiving purposes. Since they are raw, you don’t pack for the extra packaging, power supply, and interface electronics with each, just to have it sit on the shelf. My favorite of these is the HGST Deckstar NAS series.

For many editors the software world is changing with free applications, subscription models, and online services. The most common use of the latter is for review-and-approval, along with posting demo clips and short films. Kollaborate.tv, Frame.io, Wipster.io, and Vimeo are the best known. There are plenty of options and even Vimeo Pro and Business plans offer a Frame/Wipster-style review-and-approval and collaboration service. Plus, there’s some transfer ability between these. For example, you can publish to a Vimeo account from your Frame account. Another expansion of the online world is in team workgroups. A popular solution is Slack, which is a workgroup-based messaging/communication service.

As more resources become available online, the benefits of large-scale computing horsepower are available to even single editors. One of the first of these new resources is cloud-based, speech-to-text transcription. A number of online services provide this functionality to any NLE. Products to check out include Scribeomatic (Coremelt), Transcriptive (Digital Anarchy), and Speedscriber (Digital Heaven). They each offer different pricing models and speech analysis engines. Some are still in beta, but one that’s already out is Speedscriber, which I’ve used and am quite happy with. Processing is fast and reasonably accurate, given a solid audio recording.

Naturally free tools make every user happy and the king of the hill is Blackmagic Design with DaVinci Resolve and Fusion. How can you go wrong with something this powerful and free with ongoing company product development? Even the paid versions with some more advanced features are low cost. However, at the very least the free version of Resolve should be in every editor’s toolkit, because it’s such a Swiss Army Knife application.

On the other hand, editors who have the need to learn Avid Media Composer, need look no further than the free Media Composer | First. Avid has tried ‘dumbed-down’ free editing apps before, but First is actually built off of the same code base as the full Media Composer software. Thus, skills translate and most of the core functions are available for you to use.

Many users are quite happy with the advantages of Adobe’s Creative Cloud software subscription model. Others prefer to own their software. If you work in video, then it’s easy to put together alternative software kits for editing, effects, audio, and encoding that don’t touch an Adobe product. Yet for most, the stumbling block is Photoshop – until now. Both Affinity Photo (Serif) and Pixelmator Pro are full-fledged graphic design and creation tools that rival Photoshop in features and quality. Each of these has its own strong points. Affinity Photo offers Mac and Windows versions, while Pixelmator Pro is Mac only, but taps more tightly into macOS functions.

If you work in the Final Cut Pro X world, several utilities are essential. These include SendToX and XtoCC from Intelligent Assistance, along with X2Pro Audio Convert from Marquis Broadcast. Marquis’ newest is Worx4 X – a media management tool. It takes your final sequence and creates a new FCPX library with consolidated (trimmed) media. No transcoding is involved, so the process is lighting fast. Although in some cases media is copied without being trimmed. This can reduce the media to be archived from TBs down to GBs. They also offer Worx4 Pro, which is designed for Premiere Pro CC users. This tool serves as a media tracking application, to let editors find all of the media used in a Premiere Pro project across multiple volumes.

Most editors love to indulge in plug-in packages. If you can only invest in a single, large plug-in package, then BorisFX’s Boris Continuum Complete 11 and/or their Sapphire 11 bundles are the way to go. These are industry-leading tools with wide host and platform support. Both feature mocha tracking integration and Continuum also includes the Primatte Studio chromakey technology.

If you want to go for a build-it-up-as-you-need-it approach – and you are strictly on the Mac – then FxFactory will be more to your liking. You can start with the free, basic platform or buy the Pro version, which includes FxFactory’s own plug-ins. Either way, FxFactory functions as a plug-in management tool. FxFactory’s numerous partner/developers provide their products through the FxFactory platform, which functions like an app store for plug-ins. You can pick and choose the plug-ins that you need when the time is right to purchase them. There are plenty of plug-ins to recommend, but I would start with any of the Crumplepop group, because they work well and provide specific useful functions. They also include the few audio plug-ins available via FxFactory. Another plug-in to check out is the Hawaiki Keyer 4. It installs into both the Apple and Adobe applications and far surpasses the built-in keying tools within these applications.

The Crumplepop FxFactory plug-ins now includes Koji Advance, which is a powerful film look tool. I like Koji a lot, but prefer FilmConvert from Rubber Monkey Software. To my eyes, it creates one of the more pleasing and accurate film emulations around and even adds a very good three-way color corrector. This opens as a floating window inside of FCPX, which is less obtrusive than some of the other color correction plug-ins for FCPX. It’s not just for film emulation – you can actually use it as the primary color corrector for an entire project.

I don’t want to forget audio plug-ins in this end-of-the-year roundup. Most editors don’t feel too comfortable with a ton of surgical audio filters, so let me stick to suggestions that are easy-to-use and very affordable. iZotope is a well-known audio developer and several of its products are perfect for video editors. These fall into repair, mixing, and mastering needs. These include the Nectar, Ozone, and RX bundles, along with the RX Loudness Control. The first three groups are designed to cover a wide range of needs and, like the BCC video plug-ins, are somewhat of an all-encompassing product offering. But if that’s a bit rich for the blood, then check out iZotope’s various Elements versions.

The iZotope RX Loudness Control is great for accurate loudness compliance, and best used with Avid or Adobe products. However, it is not real-time, because it uses analysis and adaptive processing. If you want something more straightforward and real-time, then check out the LUFS Meter from Klangfreund. It can be used for loudness control on individual tracks or the master output. It works with most of the NLEs and DAWs. A similar tool to this is Loudness Change from Videotoolshed.

Finally, let’s not forget the iOS world, which is increasingly becoming a viable production platform. For example, I’ve used my iPad in the last year to do location interview recordings. This is a market that audio powerhouse Apogee has also recognized. If you need a studio-quality hardware interface for an iPhone or iPad, then check out the Apogee ONE. In my case, I tapped the Apogee MetaRecorder iOS application for my iPad, which works with both Apogee products and the iPad’s built-in mic. It can be used in conjunction with FCPX workflows through the integration of metadata tagging for Keywords, Favorites, and Markers.

Have a great holiday season and happy editing in the coming year!

©2017 Oliver Peters

Chromatic

Since its introduction six years ago, Apple Final Cut Pro X has only offered the Color Board as its color correction/grading tool. That’s in addition to some automatic correction features and stylized “look” effects. The Color Board interface is based on color swatches and puck sliders, instead of traditional color wheels, leaving many users pining for something else. To answer this need, several third-party, plug-in developers have created color corrector effects modules to fill the void. The newest of these is Chromatic from Coremelt – a veteran Final Cut plug-in developer.

The toolset

Chromatic is the most feature-rich color correction module currently available for FCPX. It offers four levels of color grading, including inside and/or outside of a mask, overall frame, and also a final output correction. When you first apply the Chromatic Grade effect to a clip, you’ll see controls appear within the FCPX inspector window. These are the final output adjustments. To access the full toolset, you need to click on the Grade icon, which launches a custom UI. Like other grading tools that require custom interfaces, Chromatic’s grading toolset opens as a floating window. This is necessitated by the FCPX architecture, which doesn’t give developers the ability to integrate custom interface panels, like you’ll find in Adobe applications. To work around this limitation, developers have come up with various ingenious solutions, including floating UI windows, HUDs (heads up displays), and viewer overlays. Chromatic uses all of these approaches.

The Chromatic toolset includes nine correction effects, which can be stacked in any order onto a clip. These include lift/gamma/gain sliders, lows/mids/highs color wheels, auto white balance, replace color, color balance/temperature/exposure/saturation, three types of curves (RGB, HSL, and Lab), and finally, color LUTs. As you use more tools on a clip, these will stack into the floating window like layers. Click on any of these tools within the window to access those specific controls. Drag tools up or down in this window to rearrange the order of operation of Chromatic’s color correction processes. The specific controls work and look a lot like similar functions within DaVinci Resolve. This is especially true of HSL Curves, where you can control Hue vs. Sat or Hue vs. Luma.

Masking with the power of Mocha

Corrections can be masked, in order to effect only specific regions of the image. If you select “overall”, then your correction will affect the entire image. But is you select “inside” or “outside” of the mask, then you can grade regions of the image independent of each other. Take, for example, a common, on-camera interview situation with a darkened face in front of a brightly exposed exterior window. Once you mask around the face, you can then apply different correction tools and values to the face, as opposed to the background window. Plus, you can still apply an overall grade to the image, as well as final output adjustment tweaks with the sliders in the inspector window. That’s a total of four processes, with a number of correction tools used in each process.

To provide masking, Coremelt has leveraged its other products, SliceX and TrackX. Chromatic uses the same licensed Mocha planar tracker for fast, excellent mask tracking. In our face example, should the talent move around within the frame, then simply use the tracker controls in the masking HUD to track the talent’s movement within the shot. Once tracked, the mask is locked onto the face.

Color look-up tables (LUTs)

When you purchase Chromatic, you’ll also get a LUT (color look-up table) browser and a default collection of looks. (More looks may be purchased from Coremelt.) The LUT browser is accessible within the grading window. I’m not a huge fan of LUTs, as these are most often a very subjective approach to a scene that simply doesn’t work with all footage equally well. All “bleach bypass” looks are not equal. Chromatic’s LUT browser also enables access to any other LUTs you might have installed on your system, regardless of where they came from, as long as they are in the .cube format.

LUTs get even more confusing with camera profiles, which are designed to expand flat-looking, log-encoded camera files into colorful Rec709 video. Under the best of circumstances these are mathematically correct LUTs developed by the camera manufacturer. These work as an inverse of the color transforms applied as the image is recorded. But in many cases, commonly available camera profile LUTs don’t come from the manufacturers themselves, but are actually reverse-engineered to function closely to the manufacturer’s own LUT. They will look good, but might not yield identical results to a true camera LUT.

In the case of FCPX, Apple has built in a number of licensed camera manufacturer LUTs for specific brands. These are usually auto-detected and applied to the footage without appearing as an effect in the inspector. So, for instance, with ARRI Alexa footage that was recorded as Log-C, FCPX automatically adds a LogC-to-Rec709 LUT. However, if you disable that and then subsequently add Chromatic’s LogC-to-Rec709 LUT, you’ll see quite a bit of difference in gamma levels. Apple actually uses two of these LUTs – a 2D and a 3D cube LUT. Current Alexa footage defaults to the 3D LUT, but if you change the inspector pulldown to the regular LogC LUT, you’ll see similar gamma levels to what Chromatic’s LUT shows. I’m not sure if the differences are because the LUT isn’t correct, or whether it’s an issue of where, within the color pipeline, the LUT is being inserted. My recommendation is to stick with the FCPX default camera profile LUTs and then use the Chromatic LUTs for creative looks.

In use

Chromatic is a 1.0 product and it’s not without some birthing issues. One that manifested itself is a clamping issue with 2013 Mac Pros. Apparently this depends on which model of AMD D-series GPU your machine has. On some machines with the D-500 chips, video will clamp at 0 and 100, regardless of whether or not clamping has been enabled in the plug-in. Coremelt is working on a fix, so contact them for support if you have this or other issues.

Overall, Chromatic is well-behaved as custom plug-ins go. Performance is good and rendering is fast. Remember that each tool you use on a clip is like adding an additional effects filters. Using all nine tools on a clip is like applying nine effects filters. Performance will depend on a lot of circumstances. For example, if you are working with 4K footage playing back from a fast NAS storage system, then it will take only a few applied tools before you start impacting performance. However, 1080p local media on a fast machine is much more forgiving, with very little performance impact during standard grading using a number of applied tools.

Coremelt has put a lot of work into Chromatic. To date, it’s the most comprehensive grading toolset available within Final Cut Pro X. It is like having a complete grading suite right inside of the Final Cut timeline. If you are serious about grading within the application and avoiding a roundtrip through DaVinci Resolve, then Chromatic is an essential plug-in tool to have.

©2017 Oliver Peters

Spice with Templates

One way in which Apple’s Final Cut Pro X has altered editing styles is through the use of effects built as Motion templates, using the common engine shared with Apple Motion. There are a number of developers marketing effects templates, but the biggest batch can be found at the Fxfactory website. A regular development partner is idustrial Revolution, the brainchild of editor (and owner of FCP.co) Peter Wiggins. Wiggins offers a number of different effects packages, but the group marketed under the XEffects brand includes various templates that are designed to take the drudgery out of post, more so than just being eye-catching visual effects plug-ins.

XEffects includes several packages designed to be compatible with the look of certain styles of production, such as news, sports, and social media. These packages are only for FCP X and come with modifiable, preset moves, so you don’t have to build complex title and video moves through a lot of keyframe building. The latest is XEffects Viral Video, which is a set of moves, text, and banners that fit in with the style used today for trendy videos. The basic gist of these effects covers sliding or moving banners with titles and templates that have been created to conform to both 16:9 and square video projects. In addition, there are a set of plug-ins to create simple automatic moves on images, which is helpful in animating still photos. Naturally several title templates can be used together to create a stacked graphic design.

Another company addressing this market is Rampant Design Tools with a series of effects templates for both Apple Final Cut X and Adobe Premiere Pro CC. Their Premiere Pro templates include both effects presets and template projects. The effects presets can be imported into Premiere and become part of your arsenal of presets. For example, if you what to have text slide in from the side, blurred, and then resolve itself when it comes to rest – there’s a preset for that. Since these are presets, they are lightweight, as no extra media is involved.

The true templates are actually separate Premiere Pro template projects. Typically these are very complex, layered, and nested timelines that allow you to create very complex effects without the use of traditional plug-ins. These projects are designed to easily guide you where to place your video, so no real compositing knowledge is needed. Rampant has done the hard part for you. As with any Premiere Pro project, you can import the final effects sequence into your active project, so there’s no need to touch the template project itself. However, these template projects do include media and aren’t as lightweight as the presets, so be mindful of your available hard drive space.

For Final Cut Pro X, Rampant has done much the same, creating both a set of installable Motion template effects, like vignette or grain, as well as more complex FCP X Libraries designed for easy and automatic use. As with the Premiere products, some of these Libraries contain media and are larger than others, so be mindful of your space.

Both of these approaches offer new options in the effects market. These developers give you plug-in style effects without actually coding a specific plug-in. This makes for faster development and less concern that a host application version change will break the plug-in. As with any of these new breed of effects, the cost is much lower than in the past and effects can be purchase a la carte, which enables you to tailor your editor’s tool bag to your immediate needs.

©2017 Oliver Peters

CrumplePop and FxFactory

If you edit with Final Cut Pro – either the classic and/or new version – then you are familiar with two of its long-running plug-in developers. Namely, FxFactory (Noise Industries) and CrumplePop. Last year the two companies joined forced to bring the first audio plug-ins to the FxFactory plug-in platform. CrumplePop has since expanded its offerings through FxFactory to include a total of six audio and video products. These are AudioDenoise, EchoRemover, VideoDenoise, AutoWhiteBalance, EasyTracker, and BetterStabilizer.

Like much of the eclectic mix of products curated through FxFactory, the CrumplePop effects work on a mix of Apple and Adobe products (macOS only). You’ll have to check the info for each specific plug-in to make sure it works with your application needs. These are listed on the FxFactory site, however, this list isn’t always complete. For example, an effect that is listed for Premiere Pro may also work in After Effects or Audition (in the case of audio). While most are cross-application compatible, the EasyTracker effect only works in Final Cut Pro X. On the other hand, the audio filters work in the editing applications, but also Audition, Logic Pro X, and even GarageBand. As with all of the FxFactory effects, you can download a trial through the FxFactory application and see for yourself, whether or not to buy.

I’ve tested several of these effects and they are simple to apply and adjust. The controls are minimal, but simplicity doesn’t mean lack of power. Naturally, whenever you compare any given effect or filter from company A versus company B, you can never definitively say which is the best one. Some of these functions, like stabilization, are also available within the host application itself. Ultimately the best results are often dependent on the individual clip. In other words, results will be better with one tool or the other, depending on the challenges presented in any given clip. Regardless, the tools are easy to use and usually provide good results.

In my testing, a couple of the CrumplePop filters proved very useful to me. EchoRemover is a solid, go-to, “fix it” filter for location and studio interviews, voice overs, and other types of dialogue. Often those recordings have a touch of “boominess” to the sound, because of the room ambience. EchoRemover did the trick on my trouble clip. The default setting was a bit heavy-handed, but after a few tweaks, I had the clean track I was looking for.

EasyStabilizer is designed to tame shaky and handheld camera footage. There are several starting parameters to choose from, such as “handheld walking”, which determine the analysis to be done on the clip. One test shot had the camera operator with a DSLR moving around a group of people at a construction site in a semi-circle, which is a tough shot to stabilize. Comparing the results to the built-in tools didn’t leave any clear winner in my mind. Both results were good, but not without some, subtle motion artifacts.

I also tested EasyTracker, which is designed for only Final Cut Pro X. I presume that’s because Premiere Pro and After Effects already both offer good tracking. Or maybe there’s something in the apps that makes this effect harder to develop. In any case, EasyTracker gives you two methods: point and planar. Point tracking is ideal for when you want to pin an object to something that moves in the frame. Planar is designed for tracking flat objects, like inserting a screen into phone or monitor. When 3D is enabled, the pinned object will scale in size as the tracked object gets larger in the frame. UPDATE: I had posted earlier that the foreground video seemed to only work with static images, like graphic logos, but that was incorrect. The good folks at CrumplePop pointed me to one of their tutorials. The trick is that you first have to make a compound clip of the foreground clip and then it works fine with a moving foreground and background image.

Like other FxFactory effects, you only buy the filter you want, without a huge investment in a large plug-in package, where many of the options might go unused. It’s nice to see FxFactory add audio filters, which expands its versatility and usefulness within the greater Final Cut Pro X (and Premiere Pro) ecosystem.

©2017 Oliver Peters