Telestream Switch


For many editors, Apple QuickTime Player Pro (not QuickTime Player X) has been their go-to media player and encoding application. Since this is a discontinued piece of software and Apple is actively deprecating QuickTime with each new version of Mac OS X, it stands to reason that at some point QuickTime Player Pro will cease to function. Telestream – maker of the highly-regarded Episode encoder – plans to be ready with Switch.

Switch will run on Mac and Windows platforms and has steadily gained features since its product launch. (It is currently in version 1.6.) Switch is a multi-function media player that comes in three versions: Switch Player – a free, multi-format media player with file inspection capabilities; Switch Plus – to play, inspect, and fix media file issues; and, Switch Pro – a comprehensive file encoder. All Switch versions will play a wide range of media file formats and allow you to inspect the file properties, but only the Plus and Pro paid versions include encoding.

Building on its knowledge in developing Episode and its tight relationship with Apple, Telestream hopes to make Switch the all-purpose encoder of choice for most editors. The intent is for editors to use Switch where they would normally have used QuickTime Player Pro in the past. Unlike other open source media players, Telestream can play many professional media formats (like MXF), display embedded captions and subtitles, and properly encode to advanced file formats (like Apple ProRes). Since Switch Plus and Pro are designed for single-file processing, instead of batch encoding like Episode, their prices are also lower than that of Episode.

While the playback capabilities of Switch cover many formats, the encoding/export options are more limited. Switch Plus, which was added with version 1.6, can export MPEG-2, MPEG-4, and QuickTime (.mov) files. There’s also a pass-through mode in cases where files simply need to be rewrapped. For example, you might choose to convert Canon C300 clips from MXF into QuickTime movies, but maintain the native Canon XF codec. This might make it easier for a producer to review the media files before an upcoming edit session. Switch Plus also adds playback support for HEVC and MPEG-2 on windows, AC3 audio, and pro audio meters that display tru-peak and momentary loudness values.

Switch Pro includes all of the Plus features, as well as playback of Avid DNxHD, DNxHR, and JPEG 2000 files. It can encode in QuickTime (.mov), MPEG-4, and MPEG-2 (transport and program stream) containers. You can also export still frames and iTunes Store package formats. Codec encoding support includes H.264, MPEG-2, and ProRes. (ProRes export on Windows is ProRes HQ 4:2:2 for iTunes only.) While that’s more limited than Episode, Telestream plans to add more capabilities to Switch over time.

Switch Pro is more than an encoder, it also includes SDI out via AJA i/o devices (for preview to an external calibrated device), loudness monitoring, and caption playback. Even the free Player will pass audio out to speakers through AJA cards and USB-connected Core Audio devices. Unfortunately this does not appear to work when you have a Blackmagic Design card installed. Telestream has acknowledged this as a bug that it plans to fix in the 2.0 release later this year.

The goal for the Switch product line is to be a powerful and affordable visual QC tool, that you can also use it to make corrections to metadata, formats, audio, etc., and encode to a new file. Along with the usual inspection of file properties, Switch includes a set of audio meters that display volume and loudness readings. Although it does not offer audio and video adjustment or correction controls, you can re-arrange audio channels and speaker assignments. Telestream Switch is a very useful encoder, but if you just need a versatile media player and inspection tool, then you can easily start with the free player version.

Originally written for Digital Video magazine / CreativePlanetNetworks.

©2015 Oliver Peters

Sorenson Squeeze 10


Video formats don’t hold still for long and neither do video codecs used for file encoding. As the industry looks at 4K delivery over the web and internet-based television streaming services, we now get more codecs to consider, too. Target delivery had seemed to settle on H.264 and MPEG-2 for awhile, but now there’s growing interest in HEVC/H.265 and VP9, thanks to their improved encoding efficiency. Greater efficiency means that you can maintain image quality in 4K files without creating inordinately large file sizes. Sorenson Media’s Squeeze application has been an industrial strength encoding utility that many pros rely on. With the release of Sorenson Squeeze 10, pros have a new tool designed to accommodate the new, beyond-HD resolutions that are in our future.

df0415_sqz10_5_smSorenson Squeeze comes in server and desktop versions. Squeeze Desktop 10 includes three variations: Lite, Standard and Pro. Squeeze Lite covers a wide range of input formats, but video output is limited to FLV, M4V, MP4 and WebM formats. Essentially, Lite is designed for users who primarily need to encode files for use on the web. Desktop Standard adds VP9 and Multi-Rate Bundle Encoding. The latter creates a package with multiple files of different bitrates, which is a configuration used by many web streaming services. Standard also includes 4K presets (H.264 only) and a wide range of output codecs. The Pro version adds support for HEVC, professional decoding and encoding of Avid DNxHD and Apple ProRes (Mac only), and closed caption insertion.df0415_sqz10_1_sm

All three models have added what Sorenson calls Simple Format Conversion. This is a preset available in some of the format folders. The source size, frame rate, and quality are maintained, but the file is converted into the target media format. It’s available for MP4/WebM with Lite, and MP4/MOV/MKV with Standard and Pro. Squeeze is supposed to take advantage of CUDA acceleration when you have certain NVIDIA cards installed, which accelerates MainConcept H.264/AVC encoding. I have a Quadro 4000 with the latest CUDA drivers installed in my Mac Pro running Yosemite (10.10.1). Unfortunately Squeeze Pro 10 doesn’t recognize the driver as a valid CUDA driver. When I asked Sorenson about this, they explained that MainConcept has dropped CUDA support for the MainConcept H.264 codec. “It will not support the latest cards and drivers. If you do use the CUDA feature you will likely see little-to-no speedup, maybe even a speed decrease, and your output video will have decreased quality compared to H.264 encoded with the CPU.”

df0415_sqz10_2_smAs a test, I took a short (:06) 4096×2160 clip that was shot on a Canon EOS 1DC camera. It was recorded using the QuickTime Photo-JPEG codec and is 402MB large. I’m running a 2009 8-core Mac Pro (2.26GHz), 28 GB RAM and the Quadro 4000 card. To encode, I picked the default Squeeze HEVC 4K preset. It encodes using a 1-pass variable bitrate at a target rate of 18,000Kbps. It also resizes to a UHD size of 3840×2160; however, it is set to maintain the same aspect ratio, so the resulting file was actually 3840×2024. Of course, the preset’s values can be edited to suit your requirements.

It took 3:32 (min/sec) to encode the file with the HEVC/H.265 codec and the resulting size was 13MB. I compared this to an encode using the H.264 preset, which uses the same values. It encoded in 1:43 and resulted in a 14.2MB file. Both files are wrapped as .MP4 files, but I honestly couldn’t tell much difference in quality between the two codecs. They both looked good. Unfortunately there aren’t many players that will decode and play the HEVC codec yet – at least not on the Mac. To play the HEVC file, I used an updated version of VLC, which includes an HEVC component. Of course, most machines aren’t yet optimized for this new codec.

df0415_sqz10_3_smOther features of Squeeze aren’t new, but are still worth mentioning. For example, the presets are grouped in two ways – by format and workflow. Favorites can be assigned for quick access to the few presets that you might use most often. Squeeze enables direct capture from a camera input or batch encoding of files in a monitored watch folder. In addition to video, various audio formats can also be exported.

Encoding presets can include a number of built-in filters, as well as any VST audio plug-in installed on your computer. Finally, you can add publishing destinations, including YouTube, Akamai, Limelight and Amazon S3 locations. Another publishing location is Squeeze Stream, the free account included with a purchase of Squeeze (Standard or Pro versions only). Thanks to all of these capabilities, Sorenson Media’s Squeeze Desktop 10 will continue to be the tool many editors choose for professional encoding.

Originally written for Digital Video magazine / CreativePlanetNetwork.

©2015 Oliver Peters

Sorenson Squeeze 9 Pro


Sorenson Media’s Squeeze encoder has always been at the top of the market for encoding features and quality. It’s now in the ninth generation of the software with standard, pro and premium versions. Sorenson Squeeze 9 Standard and Pro are Mac and Windows desktop applications, while Premium is designed to run on Windows servers. The difference between Standard and Pro is that Squeeze 9 Pro supports the encoding of Avid DNxHD and Apple ProRes (Mac only) codecs.

New for Squeeze 9 is an update of the user interface, HTML5 optimization, faster encoding and closed caption support. Another new feature is pre/post-roll stitching. This lets you attach an additional file, like a branding message, to the beginning and/or end of your video. These will be encoded together with the additional video clip(s) embedded into the same file – no editing required. As before, Squeeze supports import from files or camera devices and you can set up watch folders. All Squeeze purchasers get 5GB of free cloud storage with Sorenson 360, which they may use for private review and approval with clients or as a place to host videos that they’d like to embed into their own web sites.

The Sorenson Squeeze 9 presets are built around formats and workflows for easy access. If you want a specific preset, then it’s easier to find that in the format tab. On the other hand, if you want to burn DVDs, then getting there via the workflow tab makes the most sense. Of course, you can modify existing presets, create custom presets from scratch and save the ones you use most often as favorites. There is a large set of audio and video filters, which can be integrated into any preset, including VST audio filters already installed on your computer.

Publishing to the web or disc burning is part of the Squeeze workflow, so your presets can include target publishing destinations, like a YouTube channel or your Sorenson 360 account. One big feature of Squeeze is support for adaptive bitrate encoding. Most smaller users never encounter that, but it’s a requirement for many large enterprise-grade video sites. In this process, a set of different files with low to high data rates are encoded and grouped into a folder for upload. This permits the playback from that site to throttle performance by shifting between the files of these different date rates.

If you have a CUDA-enabled NVIDIA GPU card, then the encoding of AVC/H.264 content is accelerated. Even without it, encoding is fast. On my 8-core Mac Pro with an ATI 5870 card, QuickTime H.264 encoding speeds were comparable to Apple Compressor 4 with similar encoding settings and formats. There was a noticeable improvement in this version with WebM, which is the codec backed by Google and preferred for YouTube. In past tests , this was a real bear to encode. A one minute file might take 20 minutes. With Squeeze 9 it only took a couple of minutes for the same test.

The encoded quality is very good and gone are some of the contrast, gamma and saturation differences of past versions. When you encode QuickTime H.264 files, you can choose between the Apple H.264 and the Main Concept H.264 encoders. Both encoded results play fine in QuickTime Player, though each looks slightly different than a comparable file encoded using Compressor. This likely has to do with how the player interprets the flags within the encoded file. Generally the Main Concept H.264 version was the closer match.

Since I was testing the Pro version, I converted some Apple ProRes files to Avid DNxHD in the MXF format. Squeeze encodes these files complete with corresponding XML and AAF files. This means that you can simply drag the MXF and AAF files into an Avid MediaFiles/MXF/numbered folder. Then import the AAF files into Avid Media Composer and the encoded master clips appear in your bin. No further import or transcoding required. If you work in Final Cut Pro, Premiere Pro or Media Composer and prefer to batch encode a set of non-standard camera files into native DNxHD or ProRes media, then Squeeze is ideal as long as it’s a supported codec. If you purchased Avid Media Composer, then the standard version of Squeeze is included in your third-party software bundle. This can be upgraded to the Pro version by contacting Sorenson Media.

Sorenson Squeeze 9 is a healthy update to a top-notch encoding application and a valuable tool for any editor tasked with delivering a variety of formats. Android, iPad, YouTube, DVD, Blu-ray or broadcast deliverables – Squeeze has it covered.

Originally written for Digital Video magazine

©2013 Oliver Peters

Sorenson Squeeze 8.5 and 8.5 Pro

For many editors, the preferred video encoding application is Sorenson Squeeze. It’s one of the top encoders for both Mac and PC platforms and also comes bundled with Avid Media Composer in its third-party software package. Recently, Sorenson introduced the optional Pro version, which enables the encoding of Avid DNxHD MXF media, as well as Dolby Pro Audio and Apple ProRes QuickTime codecs (Mac only).

Sorenson launched Squeeze 8.5 with more features and faster encoding, especially for users with some CUDA-enabled NVIDIA GPU cards. CUDA acceleration was introduced with Squeeze 7 and accelerates presets using the Main Concept H.264/AVC codecs; however, 8.5 also accelerates MPEG-4, WebM, QuickTime and adaptive bit rate encoding. Other new features include additional input and output formats, some interface enhancements and 5GB of permanent storage with the Sorenson 360 video hosting site (included with the 8.5 purchase).

I use several different encoders and have always been a fan of Squeeze’s straightforward interface, which is organized around formats and/or workflows. Settings are easy to customize with granular control and modified presets may be saved as favorites. Although I typically import a few files, set my encoding requirements and let it go, Squeeze is also designed to allow import from a camera or work automatically from a watch folder.

The workflow aspect is not to be overlooked. You can set up Blu-ray and DVD disc burns, upload to various web designations and include e-mail notification – all within a single encoding preset. Burning “one-off” review DVDs for a client is as simple as importing the file, applying the DVD workflow preset and loading the blank media when prompted. If you use the web for client review and approval, then it’s handy to have the Sorenson 360 account built-in. This is Sorenson Media’s video hosting site running on Amazon servers, thus giving you a reliable backbone. You may set up player skins and access controls to use the site as an outward facing presence to clients – or embed the videos into your own site.

Aside from the improved speed and encoding quality of 8.5, the Pro version is a great front-end tool for video editors, too. For instance, if you don’t want to edit with the native media format, convert QuickTime files into Avid-compliant MXF media – or take Canon C300 MXF clips and convert them to ProRes for use in Final Cut. These new Pro features continue to enhance the Squeeze “brand” in the eyes of video editors as their top encoding solution.

Originally written for Digital Video magazine (NewBay Media, LLC).

©2012 Oliver Peters

CalibratedQ AVC Intra Encode

Thanks to Apple’s product development directions, the current status of all things related to the Final Cut ecosystem has professional editors a bit rattled. One by-product of this is concern over whether it is wise to master final files in one of the ProRes codecs. This concern leaves the door open to other codec options, like Sony XDCAM or Avid DNxHD. One powerful solution is Panasonic’s AVC-Intra codec, a 10-bit, 4:2:2, I-Frame compression scheme based on the H.264/AVC family.

Calibrated Software is known for its range of products, such as MXF Import, which lets Final Cut Pro “legacy” users work with native MXF media by generating reference .MOV files. Many editing applications can natively read AVC-Intra files recorded by the wide range of Panasonic P2 products; but, up until now, you couldn’t easily encode AVC-Intra masters for archiving and portability. That’s changed with the introduction of Calibrated{Q} AVC-Intra Encode.

AVC-Intra Encode is a QuickTime component that enables any QuickTime-compatible application to encode (or export) .MOV files with one of the 50Mbps or 100Mbps AVC-Intra codecs. This includes encoding applications like Adobe Media Encoder, Apple Compressor and QuickTime Player Pro, as well as NLEs, including Avid Media Composer and Apple Final Cut Pro. Simply install AVC-Intra Encode to add the AVC-Intra codec options to each application’s output choices. AVC-Intra is a cross-platform codec and both Mac OS X and Windows versions of the Calibrated{Q} encoder are available. Since this is only any encoder, you’ll need other software to play the new .MOV files. Normally this capability would be installed as part of FCP 7, FCP X or Media Composer (5.5.1 or higher); but, Calibrated software also makes an AVC-Intra Decode solution for purchase, if none of these other applications have been installed.

One unique feature is the separate Calibrated{Q} AVC-Intra Encode Options application. This is both a license manager and a tool to embed metadata into the .MOV file. MXF formats, like P2, include camera-generated metadata (clip name, reel ID, etc.), which is contained in a sidecar .XML file. Calibrated Software has included a dummy .XML file, which can be opened and modified in any text editor. Using AVC-Intra Encode Option, you can merge the customized .XML file and the .MOV file to embed that data into the .MOV file. This is compliant with Final Cut Pro X, so that when this file is imported into FCP X, any data you’ve entered, like a scene number, is displayed in the inspector window as part of the clip’s settings. Unfortunately there is no way to batch multiple .MOV and .XML files for an automated process.

Originally written for Digital Video magazine (NewBay Media, LLC).

©2012 Oliver Peters

Sorenson Squeeze 7

Sorenson Media, one of the leading encoding developers, recently released its newly updated Sorenson Squeeze 7 application.  Squeeze has become a popular encoder for many advanced media outlets, such as NBC Universal, which uses Squeeze to encode movie promotional spots for Yahoo, Google and Hulu. Most Avid Media Composer editors have used Squeeze for years, because it has been included as the default encoder within the Media Composer retail bundle (boxed version) or separately as part of Avid’s Production Suite of third party software.

If you already own or are familiar with Squeeze 6, then you’ll feel right at home with the workflow and interface design of Squeeze 7. The interface is designed with specific tabs to organize compression settings by destination, use or format requirements, including Web, Broadcast, Devices, Discs, Formats and Editing. This is a simple method of organization to make it easy to find the right preset, which may appear in more than one group. For instance, you might find the same setting under both the Devices and Formats tabs. In addition, settings can be easily modified and both preset and custom settings may be saved under a Favorites tab for quick access. As before, video can be brought into Squeeze 7 by importing a file from your hard drive, using a watch folder or by direct capture from a FireWire-connected deck or camera.

Squeeze’s Publishing Options feature was originally introduced with Squeeze 6, coinciding with the launch of Sorenson 360 – a robust, professional video hosting service on the web. Now on version 2, Sorenson 360 features content management and user privacy controls that make it an excellent client review and approval site. Sorenson 360 supports plug-ins, too, including a WordPress plug-in that allows you to post Flash or MP4 videos directly into the WordPress publishing platform.

Squeeze 7 still includes a one-year complimentary account to Sorenson 360. The Publishing Options allow you to add an upload component to any existing encoding preset. These include Akamai servers, YouTube and Sorenson 360, among others. At this time, upload settings to MobileMe galleries or Vimeo, another popular video hosting site, are not included.

If you have an established account with any of the enabled services, you may pick from existing Web Destinations presets, which are already formatted for a service’s encoding specs and include a “publish to” component. This isn’t just out to the  web, though. For example, if you select an Apple TV preset, it includes a step to publish the encoded file to iTunes on your machine. FTP publishing is also available. Lastly, you can set up e-mail or text message notifications upon completion. The point of all of these options is to allow you to establish a complete one-step, automated workflow combining import, encoding to multiple formats, publishing to multiple destinations and notification – all as a single Squeeze 7 job.

New features

Several key features were added to Sorenson Squeeze 7. Format options have been expanded to include more broadcast, blu-ray and web encodes. A Dolby-certified AC3 Consumer encoder has been added. If you have an NVIDIA graphics card using CUDA parallel GPU processing technology, you can take advantage of faster H.264 encoding. Sorenson claims up to a 3x performance boost. Even the low-cost GeForce GT120 card will yield some benefit. Don’t have an NVIDIA card? You’ll still get a boost. Squeeze 7 preferences let you launch simultaneous encoding processes, running at up to 1.5x the number of cores. In actual practice this seems to vary with the type of encoding being done, but you should be able to set the preference on an 8-core machine to 12 simultaneous processes and see multiple streams running at once.

Another new feature for Adobe Premiere Pro CS4 and CS5 editors is a Squeeze 7 plug-in. This is similar to Apple Final Cut Pro’s “export with QuickTime Conversion” and Avid Media Composer’s “send to – encoding – Sorenson Squeeze” menu options. From the Premiere Pro timeline, simply select the “export – media” command from the pulldown menu to launch Adobe Media Encoder. Within this interface you may select a Squeeze format and preset instead of an Adobe choice.

Sorenson has targeted large enterprise users with Adaptive Bitrate encoding – also newly added to Squeeze 7. One of the tricks for video hosting sites on the web is to throttle playback by switching among several different synched files encoded at various bitrates. If you are watching a web video on a mobile device and the bandwidth gets bogged down, the site can momentarily switch to a lower data rate version without interrupting the stream. If you are the compressionist who encodes such files, it requires specific target rates and folder packaging formats that are server-specific. Squeeze 7 now includes several Adaptive Streaming presets that take care of this for you. As a test, I picked the iPhone 3G preset. This automatically encoded and packaged six transport streams and the necessary reference files to link them.

Improved quality and performance

Sorenson Squeeze 7 definitely provides better quality encodes than Squeeze 5 and more options than Squeeze 6. However, if you can only use one single encoder, then quite frankly, there is no such thing as “the best” or “the fastest”. I’ve found that some encoders do better with one format than another and some do better on Windows than on a Mac and vice versa. Running Squeeze 7 on a Mac gave me great results on most, non-QuickTime encodes, like M4V, MP4, Flash and Windows Media. When it came to QuickTime-based formats, I was happier with the results from Apple Compressor, but often it was simply a toss-up.

As before, Squeeze requires a bit of color-level tweaking with some source files. This is especially true with Avid DNxHD source files on a Mac. I had several matching QuickTime test clips  using both the Avid DNxHD and Apple ProRes codecs. The DNxHD files normally look flatter as compared with the ProRes versions. QuickTime Player doesn’t expand the DNxHD luma levels from Rec. 709 to RGB for the screen. When I converted these in Apple Compressor to the Apple TV .m4v preset, the resulting files matched. When I encoded these same files in Squeeze 7, using its comparable Apple TV preset, the Avid-sourced .m4v looked flatter than the ProRes-sourced .m4v.

For accurate encodes in Squeeze 7 using Avid source files, tweak the built-in filters to adjust black restore, white restore, hue/saturation and gamma. Then save a custom preset for repeated use. This isn’t a criticism, but merely to point out that each encoder has its own peculiarities, which you have to understand in order to make the necessary custom presets. By and large, video levels of encoded files created from ProRes sources typically matched between Compressor and Squeeze 7. You will want to create custom presets for your common routines. This is important not only for proper levels, but also for controlling 16×9 and 4×3 aspect ratios and letterboxed/pillarboxed display attributes.

Time to tackle WebM

A new web format added to Squeeze 7 is Google’s WebM, which uses the On2 VP8 codec. On2 VP6 has been used in Flash, but I’ve never been a fan of these codecs. Clearly Sorenson is trying to stay on the cutting edge, should the web video tide turn away from H.264 and towards WebM. Unfortunately, it’s not ready for prime time. Every encoding attempt I made bogged down about half-way through the second pass and took about 30 minutes to complete. (I confirmed this with Sorenson’s tech support.) The WebM-encoded file did look very nice and played rather smoothly.  That shows promise, but until the encoding time comes down, a 30 minute encode for a one minute clip is unusable. In all fairness, WebM (VP8) encoding is slow on other encoders, too. According to Sorenson, the Squeeze team is currently working on optimizing it for WebM quality and speed.

Sorenson Squeeze 7 remains one of the best all-purpose encoders in the business. Plenty of format options, an easy workflow, relatively fast encodes and high-quality results. Windows users can easily select this as their only encoding application, while Apple users will find it to be a great alternative to QuickTime Pro or Compressor. For a one-step simplified encoding workflow, Squeeze 7 is hard to beat.

Written for Videography and DV magazines (NewBay Media, LLC)

© 2011 Oliver Peters

Grind those EOS files!

I have a love/hate relationship with Apple Compressor and am always on the lookout for better encoding tools. Part of our new file-based world is the regular need to process/convert/transcode native acquisition formats. This is especially true of the latest crop of HDSLRs, like the Canon EOS 5D Mark II and its various siblings. A new tool in this process is Magic Bullet Grinder from Red Giant Software. Here’s a nice description by developer Stu Maschwitz as well as another review by fellow editor and blogger, Scott Simmons.

I’ve already pointed out some workflows for getting the Canon H.264 files into an editable format in a previous post. Although Avid Media Composer 5, Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 and Apple Final Cut Pro natively support editing with the camera files – and although there’s already a Canon EOS Log and Transfer plug-in for FCP – I still prefer to convert and organize these files outside of my host NLE. Even with the newest tools, native editing is clunky on a large project and the FCP plug-in precludes any external organization, since the files have to stay in the camera’s folder structure with their .thm files.

Magic Bullet Grinder offers a simple, one-step batch conversion utility that combines several functions that otherwise require separate applications in other workflows. Grinder can batch-convert a set of HDSLR files, add timecode and simultaneously create proxy editing files with burn-in. In addition, it will upscale 720p files to 1080p. Lastly, it can conform frame-rates to 23.976fps. This is helpful if you want to shoot 720p/60 with the intent of overcranking (displayed as slow motion at 24fps).

The main format files are converted to either the original format (with added timecode), ProRes, ProRes 4444 or two quality levels of PhotoJPEG. Proxies are either ProRes Proxy or PhotoJPEG, with the option of several frame size settings. In addition, proxy files can have a burn-in with various details, such as frame numbers, timecode, file name + timecode or file name + frame numbers. Proxy generation is optional, but it’s ideal for offline/online editing workflows or if you simply need to generate low-bandwidth files for client review.

Grinder’s performance is based on the number of cores. It sends one file to each core, so in theory, eight files would be simultaneously processed on an 8-core machine. Speed and completion time will vary, of course, with the number, length and type of files and whether or not you are generating proxies. I ran a head-to-head test (main format only, no proxy files) on my 8-core MacPro with MPEG Streamclip and Compressor, using 16 H.264 Canon 5D files (about 1.55GB of media or 5 minutes of footage). Grinder took 12 minutes, Compressor 11 minutes and MPEG Streamclip 6 minutes. Of course, neither Compressor nor MPEG Streamclip would be able to handle all of the other functions – at least not within the same, simplified process. The conversion quality of Magic Bullet Grinder was quite good, but like MPEG Streamclip, it appears that ProRes files are generated with the QuickTime “automatic gamma correction” set to “none”. As such, the Compressor-converted files appeared somewhat lighter than those from either Grinder or MPEG Streamclip.

This is a really good effort for a 1.0 product, but in playing with it, I’ve discovered it has a lot of uses outside of HDSLR footage. That’s tantalizing and brings to mind some potential suggestions as well as issues with the way that the product currently works. First of all, I was able to convert other files, such as existing ProRes media. In this case, I would be interested in using it to ONLY generate proxy files with a burn-in. The trouble now is that I have to generate both a new main file (which isn’t needed) as well as the proxy. It would be nice to have a “proxy-only” mode.

The second issue is that timecode is always newly generated from the user entry field. Grinder doesn’t read and/or use an existing QuickTime timecode track, so you can’t use it to generate a proxy with a burn-in that matches existing timecode. In fact, if your source file has a valid timecode track, Grinder generates a second timecode track on the converted main file, which confuses both FCP and QuickTime Player 7. Grinder also doesn’t generate a reel number, which is vital data used by many NLEs in their media management.

I would love to see other format options. For instance, I like ProResLT as a good format for these Canon files. It’s clean and consumes less space, but isn’t a choice with Grinder. Lastly, the conform options. When Grinder conforms 30p and 60p files to 24p (23.976), it’s merely doing the same as Apple Cinema Tools by rewriting the QuickTime playback rate metadata. The file isn’t converted, but simply told to play more slowly. As such, it would be great to have more options, such as 30fps to 29.97fps for the pre-firmware-update Canon 5D files. Or conform to 25fps for PAL countries.

I’ve seen people comment that it’s a shame it won’t convert GoPro camera files. In fact it does! Files with the .mp4 extension are seen as an unsupported format. Simply change the file extension from .mp4 to .mov and drop it into Grinder. Voila! Ready to convert.

At $49 Magic Bullet Grinder is a great, little utility that can come in handy in many different ways. At 1.0, I hope it grows to add some of the ideas I’ve suggested, but even with the current features, it makes life easier in so many different ways.

©2010 Oliver Peters