Accusonus ERA4

It’s fair to say that most video editors, podcast producers, and audio enthusiasts don’t possess the level of intimate understanding of audio filters that a seasoned recording engineer does. Yet each still has the need to present the cleanest, most professional-sounding audio as part of their productions. Some software developers have sought to serve this market with plug-ins that combine the controls into a single knob or slider. The first of these was Waves Audio with their OneKnob series. Another company using the single-knob approach is a relative newcomer, Accusonus.

I first became aware of Accusonus through Avid. Media Composer license owners have been offered loyalty add-ons, such as plug-ins, which recently included the Accusonus ERA3 Voice Leveler plug-in. I found this to be a very useful tool and so when Accusonus offered to send the new ERA4 Bundle for my evaluation, I was more than happy to give the rest of the package a test run. ERA4 was released at the end of June in a Standard and Pro bundle along with discounted, introductory pricing, available until the end of July. You may also purchase each of these filters individually.

Audio plug-ins typically come in one of four formats: AU (Mac only), VST (Mac or Windows), VST3 (Mac or Windows), and AAX (for Avid Media Composer and Pro Tools). When you purchase audio filters, they don’t necessarily come in all flavors. Sometimes, plug-ins will be AU and VST/VST3, but leave out AAX. Or will only be for AAX. Or only AU. Accusonic plug-ins are installed as all four types on a Mac, which means that a single purchase covers most common DAWs and NLEs (check their site for supported hosts). For example, my Macs include Final Cut Pro X, Logic Pro X, Audition, Premiere Pro, and Media Composer. The ERA4 plug-ins work in all of these.

I ran into some issues with Resolve. The plug-ins worked fine on the Fairlight page of Resolve 16 Studio Beta. That’s on my home machine. However, the Macs at work are running the Mac App Store version of Resolve 15 Studio. There, only the VST versions could be applied and I had to re-enter each filter’s activation code and relaunch. I would conclude from this that Resolve is fine as a host, although there may be some conflicts in the Mac App Store version. That’s likely due to some differences between it and the software you download directly from Blackmagic Design.

Another benefit is that Accusonus permits each license key to be used on up to three machines. If a user has both a laptop and a desktop computer, the plug-in can be installed and activated on each without the need to swap authorizations through an online license server or move an iLok dongle between machines. The ERA4 installers include all of the tools in the bundle, even if you only purchased one. You can ignore the others, uninstall them, or test them out in a trial mode. The complete bundle is available and fully functional for a 14-day free trial.

ERA4 Bundles

I mentioned the Waves One Knob filters at the top, but there’s actually little overlap between these two offerings. The One Knob series is focused on EQ and compression tasks, whereas the ERA4 effects are designed for audio repair. As such, they fill a similar need as the iZotope’s RX series.

The ERA4 Standard bundle includes six audio plug-ins: Noise, Reverb, and Plosive Removers, De-Esser, De-Clipper, and the Voice Leveler. The Pro bundle adds two more: the more comprehensive De-Esser Pro and ERA-D, which is a combined noise and reverb filter for more advanced processing than the two individual filters. If you primarily work with well-recorded studio voice-overs or location dialogue, then most likely the Standard bundle will be all you need. However, the two extra filters in the Pro bundle come in handy with more problematic audio. Even productions with high values occasionally get stuck with recordings done in challenging environments and last-minute VOs done on iPhones. It’s certainly worth checking out the full package as a trial.

While Accusonus does use a single-control approach, but it’s a bit simplistic to say that you are tied to only one control knob. Some of the plug-ins do offer more depth so you can tailor your settings.  For instance, the Noise Remover filter offers five preset curves to determine the frequencies that are affected. Each filter includes additional controls for the task at hand.

In use

Accusonus ERA4 filters are designed to be easy to use and work well in real-time. When all I need to do is improve audio that isn’t a basket case, then the ERA filters at their default settings do a wonderful job. For example, a VO recording might require a combination of Voice Leveler (smooth out dynamics), De-Esser (reduce sibilance), and Plosive Remover (clean up popping “p” sounds). Using the default control level (40%) or even backing off a little improved the sound.

It was the more problematic audio where ERA4 was good, but not necessarily always the best tool. In one case I tested a very, heavily clipped VO recording. When I used ERA4 De-Clipper in Final Cut Pro X, I was able to get similar results to the same tool from iZotope RX6. However, doing the same comparison in Audition yielded different results. Audition is designed to preview an effect and then apply it. The RX plug-in at its extreme setting crackled in real-time playback, but yielded superior results compared with the ERA4 De-Clipper after the effect was applied (rendered). Unfortunately FCPX has no equivalent “apply,” “render and replace,” or audio bounce function, so audio has to stay real-time, which gives Accusonus a performance edge in FCPX. For most standard audio repair tasks, Accusonus’ plug-ins were equal or better than most other options, especially those built into the host application.

I started out talking about the Voice Leveler plug-in, because that’s an audio function I perform often, especially with voice-overs. It helps to make the VO stand out in the mix against music and sound effects. This is an intelligent compressor, which means it tries to bring up all audio and then compress peaks over a threshold. But learn the controls before diving in. For example, it includes a breath control. Engaging this will prevent the audio from pumping up in volume each time the announcer takes a breath. As with all of the ERA4 filters, there is a small, scrolling waveform in the plug-in’s control panel. Areas that were adjusted by the filter are highlighted, so you can see when it is active.

Voice Leveler is a good VO tool, but that type is one of the more subjective audio filters. Some editors or audio engineers compress, some limit, and others prefer to adjust levels only manually. My all-time favorite is Wave’s Vocal Rider. Unlike a compressor, it dynamically raises and lowers audio levels between two target points. To my ears, this method yields a more open sound than heavy compression. But when its normal MSRP is pretty expensive. I also like the Logic Pro X Compressor, which is available in Final Cut Pro X. It mimics various vintage compressors, like Focusrite Red or the DBX 160X. I feel that it’s one of the nicest sounding compressors, but is only available in the Apple pro apps. Adobe users – you are out of luck on that one.

From my point-of-view, the more tools the better. You never know when you might need one. The Accusonus ERA4 bundle offers a great toolset for anyone who has to turn around a good-sounding mix quickly. Each bundle is easy to install and activate and even easier to use. Operation is real-time, even when you stack several together. Accusonus’ current introductory price for the bundles is about what some individual plug-ins cost from competing companies, plus the 14-day trial is a great way to check them out. If you need to build up your audio toolbox, this is a solid set to start out with.

Check out Accusonus’ blog for tips on using the ERA plug-ins.

©2019 Oliver Peters

Luca Visual FX builds Mystery & Suspense

For most editors, creating custom music scores tends to fall into the “above my pay grade” category. If you are a whizz with GarageBand or Logic Pro X, then you might dip into Apple’s loop resources. But most commercials and corporate videos are easily serviced by the myriad of stock music sites, like Premium Beat and Music Bed. Some music customization is also possible with tracks from companies like SmartSound.

Yet, none of the go-to music library sites offer curated, genre-based, packages of tracks and elements that make it easy to build up a functional score for longer dramatic productions. Such projects are usually the work of composers or a specific music supervisor, sound designer, or music editor doing a lot of searching and piecing together from a wide range of resources.

Enter Luca Visual FX – a developer best known for visual effects plug-ins, such as Light Kit 2.0. It turns out that Luca Bonomo is also a composer. The first offering is the Mystery & Suspense Music and Sound Library, which is a collection of 500 clips, comprising music themes, atmospheres, drones, loops, and sound effects. This is a complete toolkit designed to make it easy to combine elements, in order to create a custom score for dramatic productions in the mystery or suspense genre.

These tracks are available for purchase as a single library through the LucaVFX website. They are downloaded as uncompressed, stereo AIF files in a 24-bit/96kHz resolution. This means they are of top quality and compatible with any Mac or PC NLE or DAW application. Best yet, is the awesome price of $79. The package is licensed for a single user and may be used for any audio or video production, including for commercial purposes.

Thanks to LucaVFX, I was able to download and test out the Library on a recent short film. The story is a suspense drama in the style of a Twilight Zone episode, so creating a non-specific, ethereal score fits perfectly. Drones, dissonance, and other suspenseful sounds are completely in line, which is where this collection shines.

Although I could have used any application to build this, I opted for Apple’s Final Cut Pro X. Because of its unique keyword structure, it made sense to first set up a separate FCPX library for only the Mystery & Suspense package. During import, I let FCPX create keyword collections based on the Finder folders. This keeps the Mystery & Suspense FCPX library organized in the same way as they are originally grouped. Doing so, facilitates fast and easy sorting and previewing of any of the 500 clips within the music library. Then I created a separate FCPX library for the production itself. With both FCPX libraries open, I could quickly preview and place clips from my music library to the edit sequence for the film, located within the other FCPX library.

Final Cut uses Connected Clips instead of tracks. This means that you can quickly build up and align overlapping atmospheres, transitions, loops, and themes for a densely layered music score in a very freeform manner. I was able to build up a convincing score for a half-hour-long piece in less that an afternoon. Granted, this isn’t mixed yet, but at least I now have the musical elements that I want and where I want them. I feel that style of working is definitely faster in Final Cut Pro X – and more conducive to creative experimentation – but it would certain work just as well in other applications.

The Mystery & Suspense Library is definitely a winner, although I do have a few minor quibbles. First, the music and effects are in keeping with the genre, but don’t go beyond it. When creating a score for this kind of production, you also need some “normal” or “lighter” moods for certain scenes or transitions. I felt that was missing and I would still have to step outside of this package to complete the score. Secondly, many of the clips have a synthesized or electronic tone to them, thanks to the instruments used to create the music. That’s not out of character with the genre, but I still would have liked some of these to include more natural instruments than they do. In fairness to LucaVFX, if the Mystery & Suspense Library is successful, then the company will create more libraries in other genres, including lighter fare.

In conclusion, this is a high quality library perfectly in keeping with its intended genre. Using it is fast and flexible, making it possible for even the most musically-challenged editor to develop a convincing, custom score without breaking the bank.

©2018 Oliver Peters

Audio Mixing with Premiere Pro

When budgets permit and project needs dictate, I will send my mixes out-of-house to one of a few regular mixers. Typically that means sending them an OMF or AAF to mix in Pro Tools. Then I get the mix and split-tracks back, drop them into my Premiere Pro timeline, and generate master files.

On the other hand, a lot of my work is cutting simple commercials and corporate presentations for in-house use or the web, and these are often less demanding  – 2 to 8 tracks of dialogue, limited sound effects, and music. It’s easy to do the mix inside of the NLE. Bear in mind that I can – and often have – done such a mix in Apple Logic Pro X or Adobe Audition, but the tools inside Premiere Pro are solid enough that I often just keep everything – mix included – inside my editing application. Let’s walk though that process.

Dealing with multiple channels on source clips

Start with your camera files or double-system audio recordings. Depending on the camera model, Premiere Pro will see these source clips as having either stereo (e.g. a Canon C100) or multi-channel mono (e.g. ARRI Alexa) channels. If you recorded a boom mic on channel 1 and a lavaliere mic on channel 2, then these will drop onto your stereo timeline either as two separate mono tracks (Alexa) – or as a single stereo track (C100), with the boom coming out of the left speaker and the lav out of the right. Which one it is will strictly depend on the device used to generate the original recordings.

First, when dual-mic recordings appear as stereo, you have to understand how Premiere Pro deals with stereo sources. Panning in Premiere Pro doesn’t “shift” the audio left, right, or center. Instead, it increases or decreases the relative volume of the left or right half of this stereo field. In our dual-mic scenario, panning the clip or track full left means that we only hear the boom coming out of the left speaker, but nothing out of the right. There are two ways to fix this – either by changing the channel configuration of the source in the browser – or by changing it after the fact in the timeline. Browser changes will not alter the configuration of clips already edited to the timeline. You can change one or more source clips from stereo to dual-mono in the browser, but you can’t make that same type of change to a clip already in your sequence.

Let’s assume that you aren’t going to make any browser changes and instead just want to work in your sequence. If your source clip is treated as dual-mono, then the boom and lav will cut over to track 1 and 2 of your sequence – and the sound will be summed in mono on the output to your speaks. However, if the clip is treated as stereo, then it will only cut over to track 1 of your sequence – and the sound will stay left and right on the output to your speakers. When it’s dual-mono, you can listen to one track versus the other, determine which mic sounds the best, and disable the clip with the other mic. Or you can blend the two using clip volume levels.

If the source clip ends up in the sequence as a stereo clip, then you will want to determine which one of the two mics you want to use for the best sound. To pick only one mic, you will need to change the clip’s audio configuration. When you do that, it’s still a stereo clip, however, both “sides” can be supplied by either one of the two source channels. So, both left and right output will either be the boom or the lav, but not both. If you want to blend both mics together, then you will need to duplicate (option-drag) the audio clip onto an adjacent timeline track, and change the audio channel configuration for both clips. One would be set to the boom for both channels and the other set to only the lav for its two channels. Then adjust clip volume for the two timeline clips.

Configuring your timeline

Like most editors, while I’m working through the stages of rough cutting on the way to an approved final copy, I will have a somewhat messy timeline. I may have multiple music cues on several tracks with only one enabled – just so I can preview alternates for the client. I will have multiple dialogue clips on a few tracks with some disabled, depending on microphone or take options. But when I’m ready to move to the finishing stage, I will duplicate that sequence to create a “final version” and clean that one up. This means getting rid of any disabled clips, collapsing my audio and video clips to the fewest number of tracks, and using Premiere’s track creation/deletion feature to delete all empty tracks – all so I can have the least amount of visual clutter. 

In other blog posts, I’ve discussed working with additional submix buses to create split-track exports; but, for most of these smaller jobs, I will only add one submix bus. (I will explain its purpose in a moment.) Once created, you will need to open the track mixer panel and route the timeline channels from the master to the submix bus and then the output of the submix bus back to the master.

Plug-ins

Premiere Pro CC comes with a nice set of audio plug-ins, which can be augmented with plenty of third-party audio effects filters. I am partial to Waves and iZotope, but these aren’t essential. However, there are several that I do use quite frequently. These three third-party filters will help improve any vocal-heavy piece.

The first two are Vocal Rider and MV2 from Waves and are designed specifically for vocal performances, like voice-overs and interviews. These can be pricey, but Waves has frequent sales, so I was able to pick these up for a fraction of their retail price. Vocal Rider is a real-time, automatic volume adjustment tool. Set the bottom and top parameters and let Vocal Rider do the rest, by automatically pushing the volume up or down on-the-fly. MV2 is similar, but it achieves this through compression on the top and bottom ends of the range. While they operate in a similar fashion, they do produce a different sound. I tend to pick MV2 for voice-overs and Vocal Rider for interviews.

We all know location audio isn’t perfect, which is where my third filter comes in. FxFactory is knows primarily for video plug-ins, but their partnership with Crumplepop has added a nice set of audio filters to their catalog. I find AudioDenoise to be quite helpful and fast in fixing annoying location sounds, like background air conditioning noise. It’s real-time and good-sounding, but like all audio noise reduction, you have to be careful not to overdo it, or everything will sound like it’s underwater.

For my other mix needs, I’ll stick to Premiere’s built-in effects, like EQ, compressors, etc. One that’s useful for music is the stereo imager. If you have a music cue that sounds too monaural, this will let you “expand” the track’s stereo signal so that it is spread more left and right. This often helps when you want the voice-over to cut through the mix a bit better. 

My last plug-in is a broadcast limiter that is placed onto the master bus. I will adjust this tight with a hard limit for broadcast delivery, but much higher (louder allowed) for web files. Be aware that Premiere’s plug-in architecture allows you to have the filter take affect either pre or post-fader. In the case of the master bus, this will also affect the VU display. In other words, if you place a limiter post-fader, then the result will be heard, but not visible through the levels displayed on the VU meters.

Mixing

I have used different mixing strategies over the years with Premiere Pro. I like using the write function of the track mixer to write fader automation. However, I have lately stopped using it – instead going back to manual keyframes within the clips. The reason is probably that my projects tend to get revised often in ways that change timing. Since track automation is based on absolute timeline position, keyframes don’t move when a clip is shifted, like they would when clip-based volume keyframes are used.

Likewise, Adobe has recently added Audition’s ducking for music to Premiere Pro. This uses Adobe’s Sensei artificial intelligence. Unfortunately I don’t find to be “intelligent” enough. Although sometimes it can provide a starting point. For me, it’s simply too coarse and doesn’t intelligently adjust for areas within a music clip that swell or change volume internally. Therefore, I stick with minor manual adjustments to compensate for music changes and to make the vocal parts easy to understand in the mix. Then I will use the track mixer to set overall levels for each track to get the right balance of voice, sound effects, and music.

Once I have a decent balance to my ears, I will temporarily drop the TC Electronic (included with Premiere Pro) Radar loudness plug-in to make sure my mix is CALM-compliant. This is where the submix bus comes in. If I like the overall balance, but I need to bring everything down, it’s an easy matter to simply lower the submix level and remeasure.

Likewise, it’s customary to deliver web versions with louder volume levels than the broadcast mix. Again the submix bus will help, because you cannot raise the volume on the master – only lower it. If you simply want to raise the overall volume of the broadcast mix for web delivery, simply raise the submix fader. Note that when I say louder, I’m NOT talking about slamming the VUs all the way to the top. Typically, a mix that hits -6 is plenty loud for the web. So, for web delivery, I will set a hard limit at -6, but adjust the mix for an average of about -10.

Hopefully this short explanation has provided some insight into mixing within Premiere Pro and will help you make sure that your next project sounds great.

©2018 Oliver Peters

Audio Splits and Stems in Premiere Pro Revisited

Creating multichannel, “split-track” master exports of your final sequences is something that should be a standard step in all of your productions. It’s often a deliverable requirement and having such a file makes later revisions or derivative projects much easier to produce. If you are a Final Cut Pro X user, the “audio lanes” feature makes it easy to organize and export sequences with isolated channels for dialogue, music, and effects. FCPX pros like to tweak the noses of other NLE users about how much easier it is in FCPX. While that’s more or less true – and, in fact, can be a lot deeper than simply a few aggregate channels – that doesn’t mean it’s particularly hard or less versatile in Premiere Pro.

Last year I wrote about how to set this up using Premiere submix tracks, which is a standard audio post workflow, common to most DAW and mix applications. Go back and read the article for more detail. But, what about sequences that are already edited, which didn’t start with a track configuration already set up with submix tracks and proper output routing? In fact, that’s quite easy, too, which brings me to today’s post.

Step 1 – Edit

Start out by editing as you always have, using your standard sequence presets. I’ve created a few custom presets that I normally use, based on the several standard formats I work in, like 1080p/23.976 and 1080p/29.97. These typically require stereo mixes, so my presets start with a minimum configuration of one picture track, two standard audio tracks, and stereo output. This is the starting point, but more video and audio tracks get added, as needed, during the course of editing.

Get into a habit of organizing your audio tracks. Typically this means dialogue and VO tracks towards the top (A1-A4), then sound effects (A5-A8), and finally music (A9-A12). Keep like audio types on their intended tracks. What you don’t want to do is mix different audio types onto the same track. For instance, don’t put sound effects onto tracks that you’ve designated for dialogue clips. Of course, the number of actual tracks needed for these audio types will vary with your projects. A simple VO+music sequence will only have two to four tracks, while dramatic entertainment pieces will have a lot more. Delete all empty audio tracks when you are ready to mix.

Mix for stereo output as you normally would. This means balancing components using keyframes and clip mixing. Then perform overall adjustments and “riding faders” in the track mixer. This is also where I add global effects, like compression for dialogue and limiting for the master mix.

Output your final mixed master file for delivery.

Step 2 – Multichannel DME sequences

The next step is to create or open a new multichannel DME (dialogue/music/effects) sequence. I’ve already created a custom preset, which you may download and install. It’s set up as 1080p/23.976, with two standard audio channels and three, pre-labelled stereo submix channels, but you can customize yours as needed. The master output is multichannel (8-channels), which is sufficient to cover stereo pairs for the final mix, plus isolated pairs for each of the three submixes – dialogue, music, and effects.

Next, copy-and-paste all clips from your final stereo sequence to the new multichannel sequence. If you have more than one track of picture and two tracks of audio, the new blank sequence will simply auto-populate more tracks once you paste the clips into it. The result should look the same, except with the additional three submix tracks at the bottom of your timeline. At this stage, the output of all tracks is still routed to the stereo master output and the submix tracks are bypassed.

Now open the track mixer panel and, from the pulldown output selector, switch each channel from master to its appropriate submix channel. Dialogue tracks to DIA, music tracks to MUS, and effects tracks to SFX. The sequence preset is already set up with proper output routing. All submixes go to output 1 and 2 (composite stereo mix), along with their isolated output – dialogue to 3 and 4, effects to 5 and 6, music to 7 and 8. As with your stereo mix, level adjustments and plug-in processing (compression, EQ, limiting, etc.) can be added to each of the submix channels.

Note: while not essential, multichannel, split-track master files are most useful when they are also textless. So, before outputting, I would recommend disabling all titles and lower third graphics in this sequence. The result is clean video – great for quick fixes later in the event of spelling errors or a title change.

Step 3 – Multichannel export

Now that the sequence is properly organized, you’ve got to export the multichannel sequence. I have created a mastering export preset, which you may also download. It works in the various Adobe CC apps, but is designed for Adobe Media Encoder workflows. This preset will match its output to the video size and frame rate of your sequence and master to a file with the ProRes4444 codec. The audio is set for eight output channels, configured as four stereo pairs – composite mix, plus three DME channels.

To test your exported file, simply reimport the multichannel file back into Premiere Pro and drop it onto a timeline. There you should see four independent stereo channels with audio organized according to the description above.

Presets

I have created a sequence and an export preset, which you may download here. I have only tested these on Mac systems, where they are installed into the Adobe folder contained within the user’s Documents folder. The sequence preset is placed into the Premiere Pro folder and the export preset into the Adobe Media Encoder folder. If you’ve updated the Adobe apps along the way, you will have a number of version subfolders. As of December 2017, the 12.0 subfolder is the correct location. Happy mixing!

©2017 Oliver Peters

Sound Forge Pro Mac 3

There are plenty of modern tools that deal with audio, but sometimes you need a product with a very narrow focus to do the job without compromise. That’s where Sound Forge Pro fits in. Originally part of Sonic Foundry’s software development, the product, along with its siblings Vegas Pro and Acid, migrated to Sony Creative Software. Sony, in turn, sold off those products to German software developer Magix, where they appear to have found a good home. I recently tested Sound Forge Pro Mac 3, which is the macOS companion to Sound Forge Pro 11 on the Windows side. (Sound Forge Pro 12 is expected to roll out in 2018.) Both are advanced, multichannel audio editors, dedicated to editing, processing, and mastering individual audio files, as opposed to a DAW application, which is designed for mixing.

Although Magix’s other products are PC-centric, they’ve done a good job embracing and improving the Mac products. Sound Forge also comes in the Audio Studio version – a lower cost Windows product designed for users who don’t need quite as many features. There is no Mac equivalent for it yet. The former Mac version that was sold through Apple’s Mac App Store is no longer available. Naturally a product like Sound Forge Pro may require some justification for its price tag, since the application competes with great audio tools within most modern NLEs, like Final Cut Pro X, Premiere Pro, or Resolve. It’s also competing with Adobe Audition (included with a Creative Cloud subscription) and Apple Logic Pro X, which sports a lower cost.

Sound Forge Pro is primarily designed as a dedicated audio mastering application, that does precision audio editing. It works with multichannel audio files (up to 32 tracks) in maximum bit rates of 24-bit, 32-bit, and 64-bit float at up to 192kHz. It also works with video files, although it will only import the audio channels for processing. Sound Forge Pro for the Mac comes with several iZotope plug-ins, including Declicker, Declipper, Denoiser, Ozone Elements 7, and RX Elements. (The Windows version includes a slightly different mix of iZotope plug-ins.) That’s on top Magix’s own plug-ins and any other AU plug-ins that might already be installed on your Mac from other applications. The bottom line is that you have a lot of effects and processing horsepower to work with when using Sound Forge Pro.

Even though Sound Forge Pro is essentially a single file editor, you can work with multiple individual files. Multiple files are displayed within the interface as horizontal tabs or in a vertical stack. You can process multiple files at the same time and can copy and paste between them. You can also copy and paste between individual channels within a single multichannel file.

As an audio editor, it’s fast, tactile, and non-destructive, making it ideal for music editing, podcasts, radio interviews, and more. For audio producers, it complies with Red Book Standard CD authoring. The attraction for video editors is its mastering tools, especially loudness control for broadcast compliance. Both Magix’s Wave Hammer and iZotope Ozone 7 Elements’ mastering tools are great for solving loudness issues. That’s aided by accurate LUFS metering. Other cool tools include AutoTrim, which automatically removes gaps of silence at the beginnings and ends of files or from regions within a file. There is also élastique Timestretch, a processing tool to slow down or speed up audio, while maintaining the correct pitch. Timestretch can be applied to an entire file or simply a section within a file. Effects tools and plug-ins are divided into those that require processing and those that can be played in real-time. For example, Timestretch is applied as a processing step, whereas a reverb filter would play in real time. Processing is typically fast on any modern desktop or laptop computer, thanks to the application’s 64-bit engine.

Basic editing is as simple as marking a section and hitting the delete key. You can also split a file into events and then trim, delete, move, or copy & paste event blocks. If you slide an event to overlap another, a crossfade is automatically created. You can adjust the fade-in/fade-out slopes of these crossfades. The only missing item is the ability to scrub through audio in any fashion. So, no mouse scrub or JKL-key jogging with audible audio, as you’d normally find in an NLE application. That’s apparently there in the Windows versions, but not in this Mac version.

All in all, if audio is a significant part of your workload and you want to handle it in a better and easier fashion, then Sound Forge Pro Mac 3 is worth the investment.

Originally written for RedShark News.

©2017 Oliver Peters