CineMatch from FilmConvert

One of the many color correction challenges is matching dissimilar cameras used within the same production. This tends to be the case in many web, streaming, and non-scripted projects, where budgets and availability often dictate the mix of cameras to be used. I frequently end up with RED, ARRI, Panasonic, Sony, DJI, and GoPro cameras all in the same show. Most NLEs do include basic, albeit imperfect, shot-matching features. However, now several software developers are taking that challenge head on.

One such developer is New Zealand’s FilmConvert, developers of the FilmConvert Nitrate film emulation plug-in. Their newest product is CineMatch, a camera-matching plug-in that’s currently available for DaVinci Resolve and Premiere Pro – and coming to Final Cut Pro X in the future. As with Nitrate, CineMatch is a cross-platform plug-in that may be purchased for a specific NLE host or as a bundle license to cover all products.

The CineMatch concept is very straightforward. Most productions have a main or “hero” camera – typically designated as the A-camera. Then there are other cameras for cutaways and alternate angles – B-camera, C-camera, etc. The principle is to match the look of the B- and C-cameras to that of the A-camera.

Dealing with color science

Each camera manufacturer uses different color science for their products. Sony will have a distinctly different look from Canon or Panasonic. FilmConvert builds its plug-ins based on camera packs, which are each customized for a specific manufacturer and model in order to properly match that camera’s color science.

If you have a production that mixes a Sony FX9, an ARRI Amira, and a Panasonic GH5, then each uses a different camera pack. CineMatch is designed to work with Log/RAW/BRAW formats, so there are fewer packs available on the CineMatch site than on the Nitrate site. That’s because many of the prosumer cameras supported by Nitrate do not record in log and, therefore, wouldn’t be appropriate for CineMatch. Since CineMatch uses fewer camera packs, all currently-supported camera packs are included in the installer at this point in time.

The basics of matching

To start, disable any embedded LUT or remove any that you may have added. Next, apply the CineMatch effect to the clips on the timeline in Premiere Pro or as nodes in Resolve. On A-camera clips, set the appropriate source camera profile, but no target profile. For B-cams, C-cams, and other clips, set their source camera profile; however, set their target profile to match the A-camera source.

In a situation with an ALEXA A-cam and a Panasonic EVA1 as the B-cam, the ALEXA would only use the ALEXA source profile. The EVA1 would be set to the EVA1 source, but ALEXA as the target profile. Essentially you are moving all cameras into a color space matching the ARRI ALEXA Log-C color science.

To properly view the CineMatch output, apply the REC 709 transform. However, since CineMatch has converted all of these clips into a common log space, such as ARRI’s Log-C, you can also opt to leave this transform off within the clip filter and apply a conversion LUT at a different point, such as in an adjustment layer in Premiere Pro or as a timeline grading node in Resolve. This way, CineMatch is not limited to REC 709/SDR projects.

Additional color correction tools

Ideally the camera crew should have maintained proper and consistent exposure and white balance among cameras used on a common set-up. Even better if color charts have also been recorded at the start. In a perfect world, you’d now be done. Unfortunately, that’s never the case. You’ve unified the color space, but this doesn’t automatically match one clip to the next. CineMatch includes a comprehensive color correction toolkit to further match and adjust clips. There are white balance and exposure controls for quick adjustments.

If you use the split screen comparison view in Premiere Pro or Resolve, CineMatch HSL curves can be used to refine the match between source and target clips. As with Nitrate, there’s a full set of secondary color controls, including wheels, curves, and levels. Not only can you better match cameras to each other, but you can also use CineMatch to cover most basic grading needs without ever touching Resolve’s grading controls or Premiere’s Lumetri panel.

Working with CineMatch

Although this plug-in is marketed for camera matching, you can use it completely apart from that task. That’s primarily because of the camera packs. For example, when you film with a Panasonic GH5 in a log profile, no NLE offers a stock LUT that is correct for that camera. Generally you end up just correcting it without a LUT or applying a generic Panasonic V-Log LUT. That was designed for the Varicam’s color science and is not a perfect match for every other Panasonic camera. Close, but not spot-on. CineMatch lets you apply a correction that is tailor-made for each individual camera profile, thanks to FilmConvert’s development of a wide range of professional and prosumer camera packs.

The second advantage is that you can impart the look of other cameras. For example, I’m a fan of ARRI’s color science and really prefer the look of an ALEXA over most other cameras. I can apply CineMatch to a GH5 clip, set the source profile to GH5 and the target to ALEXA and impart a bit of that ARRI color to the GH5 clip. While it’s not a replacement for shooting with an ALEXA and the color conversion might not be absolutely perfect, it’s a nice adjustment that gives me a better image than working with that clip on its own.

Finally, if you own both CineMatch and FilmConvert Nitrate, it is possible to use the two in conjunction with each other. Just be very careful of the processes and their order. In the GH5/ALEXA example, make the profile conversion in CineMatch. Make no color adjustments there and don’t apply the REC 709 transform. Then add FilmConvert Nitrate, set its profile to the ARRI settings and make your film emulation and color adjustments to taste.

Original written for ProVideo Coalition.

©2020 Oliver Peters

Avid Media Composer 2020

Avid Media Composer has been at the forefront of nonlinear, digital video editing for three decades. While most editors and audio mixers know Avid for Media Composer and Pro Tools, the company has grown considerably in that time. Whether by acquisition or internal development, Avid Technology encompasses such products as storage, live and post mixing consoles, newsroom software, broadcast graphics, asset management, and much more.

In spite of this diverse product line, Media Composer, as well as Pro Tools, continue to be the marquee products that define the brand. Use the term “Avid” and generally people understand that you are talking about Media Composer editing software. If you are an active Media Composer editor, then most of this article will be old news. But if you are new to Media Composer, read on.

The Media Composer heritage

Despite challenges from other NLEs, such as Final Cut Pro,  Final Cut Pro X, Premiere Pro, and DaVinci Resolve, Media Composer continues to be the dominant NLE for television and feature film post around the world. Even in smaller broadcast markets and social media, it’s not a given that the other options are exclusively used. If you are new to the industry and intend to work in one of the major international media hubs, then knowing the Media Composer application is helpful and often required.

Media Composer software comes in four versions, ranging from Media Composer | First (free) up to Media Composer Enterprise. Most freelance editors will opt for one of the two middle options: Media Composer or Media Composer | Ultimate. Licenses may be “rented” via a subscription or bought as a perpetual license. The latter includes a year of support with a renewal at the end of that year. If you opt not to renew support, then your Media Composer software will be frozen at the last valid version issued within that year; but it will continue to work. No active internet connection or periodic sign-in is required to use Media Composer, so you could be off the grid for months and the software works just fine.

A Media Composer installation is full-featured, including effects, audio plug-ins, and background rendering software. Depending on the version, you may also receive loyalty offers (free) for additional software from third-party vendors, like Boris FX, NewBlueFX, iZotope, and Accusonus.

Avid only offers three add-on options for Media Composer itself: ScriptSync, PhraseFind, and Symphony. Media Composer already incorporates manual script-based editing. Plain text script documents can be imported into a special bin and clips aligned to sentences and paragraphs in that script. Synchronization has to be done manually to use this feature. The ScriptSync option saves time – automating the process by phonetically analyzing and syncing clips to the script text. Click on a script line and any corresponding takes can be played starting from that point within the scene.

The PhraseFind option is a phonetic search engine, based on the same technology as ScriptSync. It’s ideal for documentary and reality editors. PhraseFind automatically indexes the phonetics of the audio for your clips. Search by a word or phrase and all matching  instances will appear, regardless of actual spelling. You can dial in the sensitivity to find only the most accurate hits, or broader in cases where dialogue is hard to hear or heavily accented.

Media Composer includes good color correction, featuring wheels and curves. In fact, Avid had this long before other NLEs. The Symphony option expands the internal color correction with more capabilities, as well as a full color correction workflow. Grade clips by source, timeline, or both. Add vector-based secondary color correction and more. Symphony is not as powerful as Baselight or Resolve, but you avoid any issues associated with roundtrips to other applications. That’s why it dominates markets where turnaround time is critical, like finishing for non-scripted (“reality”) TV shows. A sequence from a Symphony-equipped Media Composer system can still be opened on another Media Composer workstation that does not have the Symphony option. Clips play fine (no “media offline” or “missing plug-in” screen); however, the editor cannot access or alter any of the color correction settings specific to Symphony.

Overhauling Media Composer

When Jeff Rosica took over as CEO of Avid Technology in 2018, the company embraced an effort to modernize Media Composer. Needless to say, that’s a challenge. Any workflow or user interface changes affect familiarity and muscle memory. This is made tougher in an application with a loyal, influential, and vocal customer base.  An additional complication for every software developer is keeping up with changes to the underlying operating system. Changes from Windows 7 to Windows 10, or from macOS High Sierra to Mojave to Catalina, all add their own peculiar speed bumps to the development roadmap.

For example, macOS Catalina is Apple’s first, full 64-bit operating system. Apple dropped any 32-bit QuickTime library components that were used by developers to support certain codecs. Of course, this change impacted Media Composer. Without Apple rewriting 64-bit versions of these legacy components, the alternative is for a developer to add their own support back into the application, which Avid has had to do. Unfortunately, this introduces some inevitable media compatibility issues between older and newer versions of Media Composer. Avid is not alone in this case.

Nevertheless, Media Composer changes aren’t just cosmetic, but also involve many “under the hood” improvements. These include a 32-bit float color pipeline, support for ACES projects, HDR support, dealing with new camera raw codecs, and the ability to read and write ProRes media on both macOS and Windows systems.

Avid Media Composer 2020.10

Avid bases its product version numbers by the year and month of release. Media Composer 2020.10 – the most recent version as of this writing – was just released. The versions prior to that were Media Composer 2020.9 and 2020.8, released in September and August respectively. But before that it was 2020.6 from June, skipping .7. (Some of the features that I will describe were introduced in earlier versions and are not necessarily new in 2020.10.)

Media Composer 2020.10 is fully compatible with macOS Catalina. Due to the need to shift to a 64-bit architecture, the AMA framework – used to access media using non-Avid codecs – has been revamped as UME (Universal Media Engine). Also the legacy Title Tool has been replaced with the 64-bit Titler+.

If you are a new Media Composer user or moving to a new computer, then several applications will be installed. In addition to the Media Composer application and its built-in plug-ins and codecs, the installer will add Avid Link to your computer. This is a software management tool to access your Avid account, update software, activate/deactivate licenses, search a marketplace, and interact with other users via a built-in social component.

The biggest difference for Premiere Pro, Resolve, or Final Cut Pro X users who are new to Media Composer is understanding the Avid approach to media. Yes, you can link to any compatible codec, add it to a bin, and edit directly with it – just like the others. But Avid is designed for and works best with optimized media.

This means transcoding the linked media to MXF-wrapped Avid DNxHD or HR media. This media can be OPatom (audio and video as separate files) or OP1a (interleaved audio/video files). It’s stored in an Avid MediaFiles folder located at the root level of the designated media volume. That’s essentially the exact same process adopted by Final Cut Pro X when media is transcoded and placed inside an FCPX Library file. The process for each enables a bullet-proof way to move project files and media around without breaking links to that media.

The second difference is that each Avid bin within the application is also a dedicated data file stored within the project folder on your hard drive. Bins can be individually locked (under application control). This facilitates multiple editors working in a collaborative environment. Adobe adopted an analog of this method in their new Adobe Productions feature.

The new user interface

Avid has always offered a highly customizable user interface. The new design, introduced in 2019, features bins, windows, and panels that can be docked, tabbed, or floated. Default workspaces have been streamlined, but you can also create your own. A unique feature compared to the competing NLEs is that open panes can be slid left or right to move them off of the active screen. They aren’t actually closed, but compacted into the side of the screen. Simply slide the edge inward again to reveal that pane.

One key to Avid’s success is that the keyboard layout, default workspaces, and timeline interactions tend to be better focused on the task of editing. You can get more done with fewer keystrokes. In all fairness, Final Cut Pro X also shares some of this, if you can get comfortable with their very different approach. My point is that the new Media Composer workspaces cover most of what I need and I don’t feel the need for a bunch of custom layouts. I also don’t feel the need to remap more levels of custom keyboard commands than what’s already there.

Media Composer for Premiere and Final Cut editors

My first recommendation is to invest in a custom Media Composer keyboard from LogicKeyboard or Editors Keys. Media Composer mapping is a bit different than the Final Cut “legacy” mapping that many NLEs offer. It’s worth learning the standard Media Composer layout. A keyboard with custom keycaps will be a big help.

My second recommendation is to learn all about Media Composer’s settings (found under Preferences and Settings). There are a LOT of them, which may seem daunting at first. Once you understand these settings, you can really customize the software just for you.

Getting started

Start by establishing a new project from the projects panel. Projects can be saved to any available drive and do not have to be in a folder at the root level. When you create a new project, you are setting the format for frame size, rate, and color space. All sequences created inside of this project will adhere to these settings. However, other sequences using different formats can be imported into any project.

Once you open a project, Media Composer follows a familiar layout of bins, timeline, and source/record windows. There are three normal bin views, plus script-based editing (if you use it): frame, column, and storyboard. In column view, you may create custom columns as needed. Clips can be sorted and filtered based on the criteria you pick. In the frame view, clips can be arranged in a freeform manner, which many film editors really like.

The layout works on single and dual-monitor set-ups. If you have two screens, it’s easy to spread out your bins on one screen in any manner you like. But if you only have one screen, you may want to switch to a single viewer mode, which then displays only the record side. Click a source clip from a bin and it open its own floating window. Mark in/out, make the edit, and close. I wish the viewer would toggle between source and record, but that’s not the case, yet

Sequences

Media Composer does not use stacked or tabbed sequences, but there is a history pulldown for quick access to recent sequences and/or source clips. Drag and load any sequence into the source window and toggle the timeline view between the source or the record side. This enables easy editing of portions from one sequence into another sequence.

Mono and stereo audio tracks are treated separately on the timeline. If you have a clip with left and right stereo audio on two separate channels (not interleaved), then these will cut to the timeline as two mono tracks with a default pan setting to the middle for each. You’ll need to pan these tracks back to left and right in the timeline. If you have a clip with interleaved, stereo audio, like a music cue, it will be edited to a new interleaved stereo track, with default stereo panning. You can’t mix interleaved stereo and mono content onto the same timeline track.

Effects

Unlike other NLEs, timeline clips are only modified when a specific effect is applied. When clips of a different format than the sequence format are cut to the timeline, a FrameFlex effect is automatically applied for transform and color space changes. There is no persistent Inspector or Effects Control panel. Instead you have to select a clip with an effect applied to it and open the effect mode editor. While this may seem more cumbersome, the advantage is that you won’t inadvertently change the settings of one clip thinking that another has been selected.

Media Composer installs a fair amount of video and audio plug-ins, but for more advanced effects, I recommend augmenting with BorisFX’s Continuum Complete or Sapphire. What is often overlooked is that Media Composer does include paint, masking, and tracking tools. And, if you work on stereo 3D projects, Avid was one of the first companies to integrate a stereoscopic toolkit into Media Composer

The audio plug-ins provide a useful collection of filters for video editors. These plug-ins come from the Pro Tools side of the company. Media Composer and Pro Tools use the AAX plug-in format; therefore, no AU or VST audio plug-ins will show up inside Media Composer.

Due to the 64-bit transition, Avid dropped the legacy Title Tool and Marquee titler, and rewrote a new Titler+. Honestly, it’s not as intuitive as it should be and took some time for me to warm up to it. Once you play with it, though, the controls are straight-forward. It includes roll and crawl options, along with keyframed moves and tracking. Unfortunately, there are no built-in graphics templates.

Trimming

When feature film editors are asked why they like Media Composer, the trim mode is frequently at the top of the list. The other NLEs offer advanced trimming modes, but none seems as intuitive to use as Avid’s. Granted, you don’t have to stick with the mouse to use them, but I definitely find it easier to trim by mouse in Premiere or Final Cut.

Trimming in Media Composer is geared towards fluid keyboard operation. I find that when I’m building up a sequence, my flow is completely different in Media Composer. Some will obviously prefer the others’ tools and, in fact, Media Composer’s smart keys enable mouse-based trimming, too. It’s certainly preference, but once you get comfortable with the flow and speed of Media Composer’s trim mode, it’s hard to go to something else.

Avid’s journey to modernize Media Composer has gone surprisingly well. If anything, the pace of feature enhancements might be too incremental for users wishing to see more radical changes. For now, there hasn’t been too much resistance from the old guard and new editors are indeed taking a fresh look. Whether you are cutting spots, social media, or indie features, you owe it to yourself to take an objective look at Media Composer as a viable editing option.

To get more familiar with Media Composer, check out Kevin P. McAuliffe’s Let’s Edit with Media Composer tutorial series on YouTube.

Originally written for Pro Video Coalition.

©2020 Oliver Peters

Accusonus ERA5

The trend in audio plug-ins is simple-to-use effects with a minimal number of controls. Waves started this with their One Knob series – a set of equalization, reverb, and compression filters to make audio “brighter,” “phatter,” or “wetter.” In recent years, Accusonus was among the first to expand this concept to audio repair effects in order to de-ess, remove plosives, reduce noise, and so on. Last summer I reviewed their ERA4 bundle. These plug-ins have become part of my go-to toolkit when dealing with audio in Premiere Pro and/or Final Cut Pro X.

Accusonus has now introduced their ERA5 bundles, along with a new pricing and licensing model (more on that later). As before, there’s a Standard and a Pro bundle. The Standard bundle includes the set of single-button filters, while the Pro bundle adds several more advanced, multi-band filters. I’ll skip the single-button filters, since I covered those in my ERA4 review. The Accusonus site features processed samples to hear how each works. However, these filters have been updated for ERA5 and to my ears, tend to sound better than before.

In addition to the single-button filters, both bundles include these new ERA5 effects: Voice AutoEQ, Room Tone Match (only available as an AudioSuite plug-in for Pro Tools), and Voice Deepener. The ERA5 Pro bundle adds Noise Remover Pro, Reverb Remover Pro, and De-Esser Pro.

Voice AutoEQ is an intelligent equalizer that analyzes your vocal track to set a base and then offers controls to adjust the EQ towards more air, clarity, or body. Moving the puck around within the triangle results in complex, multi-frequency equalization using a single control. This filter is designed for single voices in mono or stereo tracks. It won’t work with a multi-channel, broadcast wave file and isn’t effective on a mixed dialogue track with several speakers.

The Voice Deepener filter seems like a gimmick to me. The intent is to add more bottom to a voice and make it sound fuller. Accusonus promotes it as giving the voice that “movie-trailer” effect. While a small touch of it on male voices does work, pushing it to extremes errs on the side of sounding like you are disguising the voice. It sounds downright cartoonish on female voices. Of course, that means you could use it for just such an effect, rather than only enhancement.

The three Pro effects (Noise Remover Pro, Reverb Remover Pro, and De-Esser Pro) are more advanced or multi-band versions of their companion single-button filter. You get both in the Pro bundle, so if the simpler version doesn’t achieve the correct results, use the Pro version instead.

Both bundles now include the Audio Clean-Up Assistant. This is a container that is applied as a single plug-in effect. Within it are five slots to which you can add any combination of the ERA5 processing modules. In operation, that’s a lot like iZotope’s “mothership” approach. Choose from a range of preset configurations or start with an empty container and build up your own configuration. Maybe you have a standard set of effects that you apply to every voice recording. Simply create your own channel strip configuration and save it as a custom preset. Then apply it as a single Audio Clean-Up Assistant effect.

One huge change in this past year is pricing and licensing. In the past, ERA bundles were purchased as perpetual licenses with activation keys for each separate plug-in. Now you can opt for subscription, as well as perpetual. Unfortunately, if you look at the Accusonus website, all promotion points towards subscription. It’s only when you go to the “buy now” page that you see a pulldown revealing the perpetual option. You can also purchase ERA5 Standard or ERA5 Pro through the FxFactory site (perpetual only). However, in both cases, it now appears that you can only purchase or subscribe to the bundle and not individual filters.

If you go through Accusonus, licensing is now handled in a manner similar to Adobe Creative Cloud. You set up an account and sign-in from any of the plug-in panels. When you do so, all ERA5 plug-ins attached to that account are immediately activated. No need to enter individual activation codes. However, you should not sign out. Doing so de-activates the plug-ins until you sign-in again. This may be confusing, because it implies that you have to constantly be connected to the internet. I’ve already seen confusion online about this point and Accusonus does not make it clear in their installation instructions nor on the website.

In fact, as long as you sign-in (and were connected when you signed in) and stay signed in, your plug-ins work. Disconnect from the interact, lose your connection, whatever – the plug-ins are still activated. Adobe CC works in exactly the same manner. The advantage is that you can have the ERA5 bundle installed on multiple computers and easily move your activation around as you go from one machine to the other, simply through this sign-in/sign-out method.

If you already own ERA4, then the new tools may or may not entice you to upgrade. If you don’t own either, then it’s easy to start in a trial mode and decide. The Accusonus ERA5 filters are easy to use and augment the built-in effects bundles of most DAWs and NLEs. They are real-time and don’t require too much fiddling to dial in the sound. ERA5 is a useful set of audio repair tools for video editors, podcasters, and audio engineers alike.

©2020 Oliver Peters

iZotope RX8 Audio Editor

Most digital audio and video editing applications come with a robust set of audio plug-ins, but many editors and mixers prefer to augment those with third-party effects. iZotope is the go-to brand for many who need best-in-class audio effects tools. The company offers a number of comprehensive audio products and software suites, but most video editors will primarily be interested in RX8. It’s the latest version of iZotope’s renowned audio repair product.

iZotope offers its products, including RX8, in Elements (“lite”), Standard, and Advanced versions, giving the user the option to pick the feature set that best fits their budget. Some video editing software also comes bundled with one or more of the iZotope Elements products. iZotope’s Neutron, Nectar, and Ozone each install as a single plug-in that iZotope likes to call a “mothership.” This means that you apply a single instance of Nectar to a track and it becomes a container. Then, configure the processing modules that you need within the Nectar interface. In concept, it functions like a channel strip or effects rack. The filters work in real-time within the framework of the DAW or NLE.

An audio editor plus plug-ins

RX8 is different in that it installs over a dozen individual AU, VST, and AAX plug-ins, instead of a single “mothership” plug-in. In addition, a standalone application – the RX8 Audio Editor – is also installed. That’s where the real power is.

If you are working in Audition or Premiere Pro, for example, and need to apply a De-clip or De-ess effect to a voice-over recording, then you can simply apply that individual iZotope filter to the track. However, when more extensive processing is required, then it’s time to use the RX8 Audio Editor application. Most of the time you’ll find that it’s best to process a track in this external application first and then import the processed track into your editing application.

You can use the RX Connect plug-in within some DAWs and NLEs to roundtrip the track between the host and the RX8 application, much like Adobe’s dynamic link function. Unfortunately, the RX Connect roundtrip doesn’t work in current versions of Adobe Premiere Pro and Apple Final Cut Pro X. Instead, use a “reveal in Finder” command to locate the track, open it in RX8, process it, and then bring it back into the host to replace the original clip.

What’s new in RX8

iZotope has been continually improving the RX technology from one version to the next and RX8 is no exception. Besides interface changes and improved performance, RX8 includes three new processing modules.

Guitar De-noise will be of more interest to recording engineers than video editors. It is used to remove recording issues, like string squeaks on acoustic guitars, pick attacks, and amp hum with electric guitars. Spectral Recovery is ideal for news and documentary editors. Need to deal with a lo-fi voice-over recorded on a phone? This module can be used to restore frequencies above 4kHz and render a fuller voice recording. The Wow & Flutter module can be used to correct speed and pitch variations in older soundtracks. Several of the existing processing effects have also been improved with better processing, more functionality, and/or improved module interfaces.

The real heavy lifting

The RX8 standalone editor is truly a Swiss Army Knife of processing effects and at first glance might seem a bit daunting. Tracks can be displayed as a waveform, spectrogram, or a mix of both. The right side of the interface presents the selection of effects modules. You can apply single effects or create a module chain containing a series of filters. Plus there are a ton of presets. If you have a question about how a module works, click on the question mark icon in the upper right corner of the module panel and that takes you to iZotope’s website for reference information. However, you can also just start with Repair Assistant, which automatically analyzes the track and offers suggested processing. The Assistant presents A, B, and C preview options – pick one and tweak the settings further, if needed.

Many of the RX8 modules are processor-intensive. Depending on the function, some can be previewed in real-time. Others need to be rendered first and then you can compare and evaluate the before and after versions. RX8 maintains a history, so it’s easy to reject any changes that you’ve made, return to the initial state of the file, and try something different.

One interesting effect is Music Rebalance. Let’s say you have a completely mixed track of voice with music. Now you want the voice to be more dominant in the mix; but, remixing the original isn’t an option. One way to get there is Music Rebalance, which isolates and separates the component parts of the mix. This enables you to change the relative levels of each in the mix. As a by-product, it will also generate separate, isolated tracks, such as just the voice track. While such isolation isn’t 100% perfect, it’s some of the best isolation that I’ve heard.

But wait… There’s more

RX8 offers a large toolkit that goes way beyond the scope of this review. Here are just a few more highlights. If you need to get in deep for more audio surgery, then you can use Spectral Repair. It’s much like working with Photoshop. Select and then remove, replace, or “heal” noises, clicks, and other artifacts visible in the spectrogram.

Another useful feature is EQ Match (only available in RX8 Advanced). Do you have two different VO recordings done by the same talent at different times and they don’t sound the same? Use EQ Match to correct one to closely match the other. Editors who need to deliver final shows that adhere to proper loudness specs will be happy with the improved Loudness Control to monitor and adjust levels that meet broadcast targets.

The RX8 Audio Editor can now have up to 32 tabs of individual files loaded at once. These can be combined into a single Composite tab that allows you to apply the same processing simultaneously to all. In addition, RX8 also offers batch processing of audio files. Simply set up a module chain with the desired effects and settings, load multiple files, and apply that module chain to the batch. From there, export in a range of file formats and bit depths.

iZotope’s complete product line forms a comprehensive audio toolkit. RX8 is the most relevant to video editors and audio post engineers. It’s a tool that will also benefit podcasters and vloggers. In short, anyone who deals with dialogue-heavy material. RX8 represents the latest version of a product that’s being constantly improved. There certainly are competing plug-in packages that offer some similar filters as individual plug-ins. However, nothing on the market is as all-encompassing within a single tool for cleaning, repairing, and restoring audio than iZotope RX8.

Originally written for Pro Video Coalition.

©2020 Oliver Peters

Color Finale Connect – Remote Grading for FCPX

Remote workflows didn’t start with COVID, but that certainly drove the need home for many. While editing collaboration at a distance can be a challenge, it’s a far simpler prospect than remote color grading. That’s often a very interactive process that happens on premises between a colorist and a client, director, or cinematographer. Established high-end post facilities, like Company3 with locations in the US, Canada, and England, have pioneered remote color grading sessions using advanced systems like Resolve and Baselight. This allows a director in Los Angeles and a colorist in London to conduct remote, real-time, interactive grading sessions. But the investment in workflow development, hardware, and grading environments to make this happen is not inconsequential.

High-end remote grading comes to Final Cut Pro X

The Color Finale team has been on a quest to bring advanced grading tools to the Final Cut Pro X ecosystem with last December’s release of Color Finale 2. Many editors are working from home these days, so the team decided to leverage the frameworks for macOS and FCPX to enable remote grading in a far simpler method than with other grading solutions.

The result is Color Finale Connect, which is a Final Cut Pro X workflow extension currently in free public beta. Connect enables two or more Final Cut Pro X users to collaborate in near-real-time in a color grading session, regardless of their location. This review is in the context of long distance sessions, but Connect can also be used within a single facility where the participants might be in other parts of the building or in different buildings.

Color Finale Connect requires each user in a session to be on macOS Catalina, running licensed copies of Final Cut Pro X (not trial) and Color Finale 2.2 Pro (or higher). Download and install Color Finale Connect, which shows up as a Final Cut workflow extension. You can work in a Connect session with or without local media on every participant’s system. In order to operate smoothly and keep the infrastructure lightweight, person-to-person communication is handled outside of Connect. For example, interact with your director via Skype or Zoom on an iPad while you separately control Final Cut on your iMac.

Getting started

To start a session, each participant launches the Color Finale Connect extension within Final Cut. Whoever starts a session is the “broadcaster” and others that join this session are “followers.” The session leader (who has the local media) drags the Project icon to the Connect panel and “publishes” it. This generates a session code, which can be sent to the other participants to join the session from within their Connect extension panels.

Once a session is joined, the participants drag the Project icon from the Connect panel into an open FCPX Event. This generates a timeline of clips. If they have the matching local media, the timeline will be populated with the initial graded clips. If they don’t have media, then the timeline is populated with placeholder clips. Everyone needs to keep their Connect panel open to stay in the session (it can be minimized).

Data transfer is very small, since it consists mainly of Color Finale instructions; therefore, crazy-fast internet speeds aren’t required. It is peer-to-peer and doesn’t live anywhere “in the cloud.” If a participant doesn’t have local media installed, then as the session leader makes a color correction change in Color Finale 2 Pro, an “in-place” full-resolution frame is sent for that clip on the timeline. As more changes are made, the frames are updated in near-real-time.

The data communication is between Color Finale on one system and Color Finale on the others. All grading must happen within the Color Finale 2 Pro plug-in, not FCPX’s native color wheels or other plug-ins. The “in-place” frames support all native Final Cut media formats, such as H.264, ProRes, and ProRes RAW; however, formats that require a plug-in, like RED camera raw files, will not transmit “in-place” frames. In that case, the data applied to the placeholder frame is updated, but you won’t see a reference image.

This isn’t a one-way street. The session leader can enable any participant to also have control. Let’s say the session leader is the colorist and the director of photography is a participant. The colorist can enable remote control for the DP, which would permit them to make tweaks on their own system. This in turn would update back on the colorist’s system, as well as for all the other participants.

Color Finale Connect workflows

I’ve been testing a late-stage beta version of Connect and Color Finale 2.2 Pro and the system works well. The “in-place” concept is ingenious, but the workflow is best when each session member has local media. This has been improved with the enhanced proxy workflow updated in Final Cut Pro X 10.4.9. Let’s say the editor has the full-resolution, original media and generates smaller proxies – for example, 50% size H.264 files. These are small enough that you can easily send the Library and proxy media to all participants using services like WeTransfer, MASV, FileMail, or Frame.io.

One of the session members could be a favored colorist on the other side of the world. In this case, he or she would be working with the proxy media. If the editor and colorist are both able to control the session, then it becomes highly interactive. Formats like RED don’t pose a problem thanks to the proxy transcodes, as long as no local changes are made outside of the Color Finale plug-in. In other words, don’t change the RED raw source settings within this session. Once the colorist has completed the grade using proxy media, those grading settings would be updated through a Connect session on the editor’s system where the original media resides.

Color management

How do you know that your client sees the color in the same way as you do on a reference display? Remote color grading has always been hampered by color management and monitor calibration. It would, of course, be ideal for each participant in the session to have Blackmagic or AJA output hardware connected to a calibrated display. If there is an a/v output for FCPX, then the Connect session changes will also be seen on that screen. But that’s a luxury most clients don’t have.

This is where Apple hardware, macOS, and Final Cut Pro X’s color management come to the rescue and make Color Finale Connect a far simpler solution than other methods. If both you and your client are using Apple hardware (iMac, iMac Pro, Pro Display XDR) then color management is tightly controlled and accurate. First make sure that macOS display settings like True Tone and Night Shift are turned off on all systems. Then you are generally going to see the same image within the Final Cut viewer on your iMac screen as your client will see on theirs.

The one caveat is that users still have manual control of the screen brightness, which can affect the perception of the color correction. One tip is to include a grayscale or color chart that can be used to roughly calibrate the display’s brightness setting. Can everyone just barely see the darkest blocks on the chart? If not, brighten the display setting slightly. It’s not a perfect calibration, but it will definitely get you in the ballpark.

Color Finale 2 Pro turns Final Cut Pro X into an advanced finishing solution. Thanks to the ecosystem and extensions framework, Final Cut opens interesting approaches to collaboration, especially in the time of COVID. Tools like Frame.io and Postlab enable better long-distance collaboration in easier-to-use ways than previous technologies. Color Finale Connect brings that same ease-of-use and efficient remote collaboration to FCPX grading. Remember this is still a beta, albeit a stable one, so make sure you provide feedback should any issues crop up.

Originally written for FCP.co.

©2020 Oliver Peters