Beyond the Supernova

No one typifies hard driving, instrumental, guitar rock better than Joe Satriani. The guitar virtuoso – known to his fans as Satch – has sixteen studio albums under his belt, along with several other EPs, live concert and compilation recordings. In addition to his solo tours, Satriani founded the “G3”, a series of short tours that feature Satriani along with a changing cast of two other all-star, solo guitarists, such as Steve Vai, Yngwie Malmsteen, Guthrie Govan, and others. In another side project, Satriani is the guitarist for the supergroup Chickenfoot, which is fronted by former Van Halen lead singer, Sammy Hagar.

The energy behind Satriani’s performances was captured in the new documentary film, Beyond the Supernova, which is currently available on the Stingray Qello streaming channel. This documentary grew out of the general behind-the-scenes coverage of Satriani’s 2016 and 2017 tours in Asia and Europe, to promote his 15th studio album, Shockwave Supernova. Tour filming was handled by Satriani’s son, ZZ (Zachariah Zane) – an up-and-coming, young filmmaker. The tour coincided with Joe Satriani’s 60th birthday and 30 years after the release of his multi-platinum-selling album Surfing with the Alien. These elements, as well as capturing Satriani’s introspective nature, provided the ingredients for a more in-depth project, which ZZ Satriani produced, directed and edited.

According to Joe Satriani in an interview on Stingray’s PausePlay, “ZZ was able to capture the real me in a way that only a son would understand how to do; because I was struggling with how I was going to record a new record and go in a new direction. So, as I’m on the tour bus and backstage – I guess it’s on my face. He’s filming it and he’s going ‘there’s a movie in here about that. It’s not just a bunch of guys on tour.’”

From music to filmmaking

ZZ Satriani graduated from Occidental College in 2015 with a BA in Art History and Visual Arts, with a focus on film production. He moved to Los Angeles to start a career as a freelance editor. I spoke with ZZ Satriani about how he came to make this film. He explained, “For me it started with skateboarding in high school. Filmmaking and skateboarding go hand-in-hand. You are always trying to capture your buddies doing cool tricks. I gravitated more to filmmaking in college. For the 2012 G3 Tour, I produced a couple of web videos that used mainly jump cuts and were very disjointed, but fun. They decided to bring me on for the 2016 tour in order to produce something similar. But this time, it had to have more of a story. So I recorded the interviews afterwards.”

Although ZZ thinks of himself as primarily an editor, he handed all of the backstage, behind-the-scenes, and interview filming himself, using a Sony PXW-FS5 camera. He comments, “I was learning how to use the camera as I was shooting, so I got some weird results – but in a good way. I wanted the footage to have more of a filmic look – to have more the feeling of a memory, than simply real-time events.”

The structure of Beyond the Supernova intersperses concert performances with events on the tour and introspective interviews with Joe Satriani. The multi-camera concert footage was supplied by the touring support company and is often mixed with historical footage provided by Joe Satriani’s management team. This enabled ZZ to intercut performances of the same song, not only from different locations, but even different years, going back to Joe Satriani’s early career.

The style of cutting the concert performances is relatively straightforward, but the travel and interview bridges that join them together have more of a stream-of-consciousness feel to them and are often quite psychedelic. ZZ says, “I’m not a big [Adobe] After Effects guy, so all of the ‘effects’ are practical and built up in layers within [Adobe] Premiere Pro. The majority of ‘effects’ dealt with layering, blending and cropping different clips together. It makes you think about the space within the frame – different shapes, movement, direction, etc. I like playing around that way – you end up discovering things you wouldn’t have normally thought of. Let your curiosity guide you, keep messing with things and you will look at everything in a new way. It keeps editing exciting!”

Premiere Pro makes the cut

Beyond the Supernova was completely cut and finished in Premiere Pro. ZZ explains why,  “Around 2011-12, I made the switch from [Apple] Final Cut Pro to Premiere Pro while I was in a film production class. They informed us that was the new standard, so we rolled with it and the transition was very smooth. I use other apps in the Adobe suite and I like the layout of everything in each one, so I’ve never felt the need to switch to another NLE.”

ZZ Satriani continues, “We had a mix of formats to deal with, including the need to upscale some of the standard definition footage to HD, which I did in software. Premiere handled the PXW-FS5’s XAVC-L codec pretty well in my opinion. I didn’t transcode to Pro Res, since I had so much footage, and not a lot of external hard drive space. I knew this might make things go more slowly – but honestly, I didn’t notice any significant drawbacks. I also handled all of the color correction, using Premiere’s Lumetri color controls and the FilmConvert plug-in.” Satriani created the sound design for the interview segments, but John Cuniberti (who has also mixed Joe Satriani’s albums) re-mixed the live concert segments in his studio in London. The final 5.1 surround mix of the whole film was handled at Skywalker Sound.

The impetus pushing completion was entry into the October 2017 Mill Valley Film Festival. ZZ says, “I worked for a month putting together the trailer for Mill Valley. Because I had already organized the footage for this and an earlier teaser, the actual edit of the film came easily. It took me about two months to cut – working by myself in the basement on a [2013] Mac Pro. Coffee and burritos from across the street kept me going.” 

Introspection brings surprises

Fathers and sons working together can often be an interesting dynamic and even ZZ learned new things during the production. He comments, “The title of the film evolved out of the interviews. I learned that Joe’s songs on an album tend to have a theme tied to the theme of the album, which often has a sci-fi basis to it. But it was a real surprise to me when Joe explained that Shockwave Supernova was really his character or persona on stage. I went, ‘Wait! After all these years, how did I not know that?’”

As with any film, you have to decide what gets cut and what stays. In concert projects, the decision often comes down to which songs to include. ZZ says, “One song that I initially thought shouldn’t be included was Surfing with the Alien. It’s a huge fan favorite and such an iconic song for Joe. Including it almost seemed like giving in. But, in a way it created a ‘conflict point’ for the film. Once we added Joe’s interview comments, it worked for me. He explained that each time he plays it live that it’s not like repeating the past. He feels like he’s growing with the song – discovering new ways to approach it.”

The original plan for Beyond the Supernova after Mill Valley was to showcase it at other film festivals. But Joe Satriani’s management team thought that it coincided beautifully with the release of his 16th studio album, What Happens Next, which came out in January of this year. Instead of other film festivals, Beyond the Supernova made its video premiere on AXS TV in March and then started its streaming run on Stingray Qello this July. Qello is known as a home for classic and new live concerts, so this exposes the documentary to a wider audience. Whether you are a fan of Joe Satriani or just rock documentaries, ZZ Satriani’s Beyond the Supernova is a great peek behind the curtain into life on the road and some of the thoughts that keep this veteran solo performer fresh.

Images courtesy of ZZ Satriani.

©2018 Oliver Peters

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