Molly’s Game

Molly Bloom’s future looked extremely bright. A shot at Olympic skiing glory leading to entry into a leading law school. But an accident during qualifying trials for the U. S. ski team knocked her out of the running for the Salt Lake City games. (Bloom notes in her own memoir that it was her decision to retire and change the course of her life, rather than the minor accident.) She moved to Los Angeles and ended up running high stakes, private poker games with her boss at the time. These games included A-list celebrities, hedge fund managers, and eventually, members of the Russian mob. Bloom quickly earned the nickname as the “poker princess”. This all came crashing down when Bloom was busted by the FBI and sentenced for her role in the gambling ring.

Bloom’s memoir came to the attention of screenwriter Aaron Sorkin (The Social Network, Moneyball, Steve Jobs), who not only made this his next film script, but also his debut as a film director. Sorkin stayed close to the facts that Bloom described in her own memoir and consulted her during the writing of the screenplay. The biggest departure is that Bloom named some celebrities at these games, who had previously been revealed in released court documents. Sorkin opted to fictionalize them, explaining that he would rather focus the story on Bloom’s experiences and not on Hollywood gossip. Jessica Chastain (The Zookeeper’s Wife, A Most Violent YearZero Dark Thirty) stars as Molly Bloom.

Although three editors are credited for Molly’s Game, the back story is that a staggered schedule had to be worked out. The post production of Steve Jobs connected feature film editor Elliot Graham (Milk, 21, Superman Returns) with that film’s writer and director – Sorkin and Danny Boyle (T2 Trainspotting, 127 Hours, Slumdog Millionaire). Graham was tapped to cut Molly’s Game later into the process, replacing its original editor. He brought Josh Schaeffer (The Last Man on Earth, Detroiters, You’re the Worst) on as associate editor to join him. Graham started the recut with Schaeffer, but a prior schedule commitment to work on Trust for Boyle, saw him exiting the film early. (Trust is the BBC’s adaptation of the Getty kidnapping story.) Graham was able to bring the film about 50% of the way through post. Alan Baumgarten (Trumbo, American Hustle, Gangster Squad) picked up for Graham and edited with Schaeffer to the finish, thus earning all three an editing credit.

Working with a writer on his directorial debut

It can always be a challenge when a writer is close to the editing process. Scenes that may be near and dear to the writer are often cut, leading to tension. I asked the three about this situation. Graham says, “Aaron has always been on set with his other films and worked very closely with the director. So, he understands the process, having learned from some of the best directors in the business. I had a great time with Aaron on Steve Jobs. He’s an incredibly lovely and generous collaborator who brings out the best in his team.”

Baumgarten expands, “Working with Aaron was fun, because he appreciates being challenged. He’s open to seeing what an editor brings to the film. Aaron wrote a tight script that didn’t need to be re-arranged. Only about 20 minutes came out. We cut one small scene, but it was mostly trimming here and there. You want to be careful not to ruin the rhythm of his writing.”

Graham continues, “Aaron also found his own visual vocabulary. A lot of the story is told in time jumps, from present day to the past in flashbacks. Aaron always is looking for rapid fire, overlapping dialogue. It’s part of his uniqueness and it’s a joy to cut. What was new for Aaron was using voice over to drive things.”

 Another new challenge was the use of stock footage. About 150 stock shots were used for cutaways and mini-montages throughout the film. Most of these were never originally scripted. Graham says, “Stock footage was something I chose to start injecting into the film with Aaron’s collaboration when I came on. We felt it was useful to have visual references for some of the voice overs – to connect visuals with words, which helps to land Aaron’s linguistic ideas for viewers. This began with the opening ski sequence – the first thing I cut when I came on board.”

The editors would pull down shots from a variety of internet sources and then the actual footage had to be found and cleared. The editors ultimately partnered with STALKR to find and clear all of the stock shots that were used. Visual effects were handled by Mr. X in Toronto. Originally, only 90 shots were budgeted (for example, snow falling in the ski sequences), but in the end, there were almost 600 visual effects shots in the final film.

Musicality of the performance

Baumgarten explains the musicality of Sorkin’s style. He says, “Aaron knew the film he wanted and had that in his head. Part of his writing process is to read his dialogue out loud and listen for the cadence of the performance. As you go through takes, the film is always moving in the right direction. As a writer/director, he doesn’t need variations or ad libs in an actor’s performance from one take to another, because he knows what the intention of the line is. As editors, we didn’t need to experiment with different calibrations of the performance. The experimentation came in with how we wove in the voice-over and played with the general rhythm.”

Graham adds, “Daniel Pemberton is the composer I worked with on Steve Jobs. I brought on Carl Kaller, a great music editor, when I came on. I knew that the music and dialogue had to dance a beautiful rhythm together for the film to be its best. With a compressed schedule to finish the film, we needed someone like Carl to help choreograph that dance.”

Baumgarten continues, “Daniel was involved early and provided us with temp tracks, which was a great gift. We didn’t have to use scores from other composers as temp music. Carl was just down the hall, so it was easy to weave Daniel’s temp elements in and around the dialogue and voice-over during the editing stage. There is interplay between the voice-over and the music, and the VO is like another musical element.”

Avid for the post

The post operation followed a standard feature film set-up. Avid Media Composer for the editing work stations, tied to Avid ISIS shared storage. The film was shot digitally using ARRI Alexas.

Production covered 48 days ending in February [2017]. It took 10 weeks to get to a director’s cut and then editing on Molly’s Game continued for about six months, which included visual effects, final sound mix and color correction. Schaeffer explains, “The dialogue scenes were scripted using [Avid] ScriptSync. Aaron was familiar with ScriptSync from The Newsroom, and it was a great help for us on this film. It’s the best way to have everything readily available and it allows us to be extremely thorough. If Aaron wanted to change a single word in a take, we were always able to find all of the alternates and make the change quite easily.”

Schaeffer continues, “Aaron methodically worked in a reel-by-reel order. We would divide up sequences between us at breaks that made sense. But when it came time to review the cut on a sequence, we would all review together. A lot people think that you have three editors on a film because the project is so difficult. The truth is that it lets you be more creative. Productions shoot so much footage these days, that it’s great to be able to experiment. Having multiple editors on a film enables you to take the time to be creative. We were all glad that Aaron set up an environment, which made that possible.”

Originally written for Digital Video magazine / Creative Planet Network

©2018 Oliver Peters

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Blackmagic Design DaVinci Resolve 14

DaVinci Resolve has made its mark as one of the premier color correction applications for the film and video industries. With the introduction of Resolve 14*, it’s clear that Blackmagic Design has set its sights higher. Advanced editing functions and the inclusion of the Fairlight audio engine put Resolve on track to be the industry’s latest all-in-one post-production powerhouse. I’ve reviewed Resolve in the past as a grading application, but my focus here is editing. Right at the start, let me paraphrase the judges on History Channel’s Forged in Fire series – ‘This NLE can cut!’ If you have no prior allegiances to other editing platforms, then using Resolve as your NLE of choice is a no-brainer.

(*This review was originally written right after the release of Resolve 14 in late 2017.)

DaVinci Resolve 14 comes in two flavors, DaVinci Resolve 14 (free) and DaVinci Resolve Studio ($299). Upgrades have been free to date. It’s the only NLE to support three operating systems: macOS, Windows, and Linux. Mac users also have the option to download Resolve (free) or purchase Resolve Studio through the Apple Mac App Store. These versions are basically the same as those on Blackmagic Design’s website, but with some differences, due to the requirement that App Store software be sandboxed.

Resolve offers the majority of the same features as Resolve Studio. The primary limitations are that exports are capped at UltraHD (3840×2160), and that features such as stereo3D, lens distortion correction, noise reduction, and collaboration require Resolve Studio. Regardless of the version, Resolve is a very deep application that’s been battle-tested through years of high-pressure, enterprise-grade deployment. But is that enough to sway loyal Final Cut Pro X, Premiere Pro, or Media Composer editors to switch? There’s certainly interest, as Stephen Mirrione pointed out in my recent Suburbicon interview, so I wouldn’t be surprised to hear news of a TV show or small feature film being edited with Resolve in the coming year.

The all-in-one concept

Creating a single application that’s good at many different tasks can be daunting and more often than not has been unsuccessful. In the case of Resolve, Blackmagic Design has taken a modal approach by splitting the interface into five pages: Media (ingest/import), Edit, Color, Fairlight (audio mixing), and Deliver (export/output).

The workflow follows a logical, left-to-right path through these five stages of post-production. With each page/mode change, the user interface is reconfigured to best suit the task at hand. The Edit page sports a standard source/record/bin/track layout similar to Media Composer, Premiere Pro, or Final Cut Pro 7. Color switches to the familiar tools and nodes of DaVinci color correction. The Fairlight mixing page isn’t just a mimic of the Fairlight interface. The engineers completely swapped out the audio guts of Resolve and replaced it with the Fairlight audio engine.

Not only is the interface that of a respected DAW, but it is also possible to expand your system with Fairlight’s audio acceleration card, as well as add a Fairlight mixing desk. This means that in a multi-suite facility, you can have task-specific rooms optimized for editing, color grading, or audio mixing – all using the exact same software application without the need for roundtrips or other list translations.

But does it work?

I put both versions of Resolve 14 through the paces and the application is reasonably solid, given how much has changed from version 12 (there was no version 13). General media management, editing, and audio processing is top notch. If you want audio/video output, Blackmagic Design Decklink or UltraStudio hardware is required. There is also a Cinema viewer function for fullscreen viewing on your computer display. With dual displays, the edit interface can be on one along with fullscreen video on the other.

The Fairlight mode will likely require a bit of rethinking by editors used to mixing audio in other NLEs, since it uses a DAW-style interface. Many well-known physical mixing consoles, like those from Solid State Logic, feature channel strips with built-in EQs, compressors, etc. That’s how Fairlight treats these software channels or tracks. Each track can have its own combination of Fairlight audio processing functions. Stick with those and you’ll be happy, although other audio filters on your computer, like Apple AU plug-ins, are accessible. Mixing and audio editing is good with subframe accuracy and the 14.1 update added linked groups to lock faders together. The pace of Fairlight integration was quite fast, but it’s still a bit rough. I encountered a number of application crashes only in the Fairlight page, while scrubbing audio.

Whether or not you like the editing is more a function of personal style and preference. The user interface design is a lot like Final Cut Pro X, except with bins and tracks. Interface windows, tabs, and panels can be opened or pulled down into various screen configurations, but you don’t have freeform control over size and position. Clearly Premiere Pro is king in that department. Some design choices aren’t consistent. For example, you can’t enable a single-viewer layout when using two displays.

Multicam editing is solid, but I experienced a small bit of latency in the viewer when cutting camera angles on-the-fly. It’s minor and may or may not bother you. You can sync clips by various methods, such as timecode or waveform, but oddly, it seemed to be too lax. In my tests, it would frequently sync clips that it shouldn’t have when a sync relationship didn’t exist.

There are a number of things in Resolve’s design that take getting used to. For example, a Resolve project is locked to the frame rate you picked when that new project was created – same as with Avid. This means you can’t mix sequences with different frame rates within the same project. There are no adjustment layers, although you can fake it in the Color page by using clip and program-based corrections. Color management via LUTs (look-up tables) is much deeper than any other NLE. You can set color management with LUTs to be global, which is best when the project uses only one camera type. Conversely, input LUTs may be applied singly or in a batch to specific cameras in a bin. But, when you do that, the LUT process doesn’t show up in the color correction node (only its result), when you switch to the Color page. On the plus side, real time performance has been improved from previous versions and the built-in effects include filters that you don’t often find in the basic build of other NLEs, like glow and watercolor effects. In addition to great built-in effects, third-party OpenFX packages, like Boris Continuum Complete and Sapphire are also available.

Collaboration

Resolve uses bin-locking like Avid Media Composer. The first editor to open a bin has read/write permission to it. Any other editor can open that same bin in a read-only mode. For example, in a long-form project, separate bins might be organized for Act 1, Act 2, and so on. Different editors can separately work on parts of the film at the same time. Since this all happens in a single database file, it always reflects the most current state of the project.

To set up shared projects, a different PostgreSQL database is required, which is installed through the custom options of the installer. Make sure you are using the most recent version when upgrading Resolve, since the older versions of PostgreSQL are no longer compatible with the newest OS versions. One machine on the network hosts this database and then other workstations connect to that database to access the Resolve projects. Only that host machine needs to have PostgreSQL software installed on it. The process of adding and connecting shared databases has been improved and simplified with the release of 14.1.1 (and later), which now includes an additional server set-up utility application.

In testing collaboration features, I initially ran into set-up problems. These were eventually fixed when I disabled the macOS firewall on the host machine, which was blocking access from the other connected Macs to its shared database. This took some back and forth with Blackmagic Design’s helpful support engineers until we figured out why I was getting the connection errors. Since I had to return the additional “dongle” (USB license key) before this was fixed, I wasn’t able to test two editors simultaneously editing within the same open project. However, the ability to open any shared project from any qualified computer on the network was just fine.

DaVinci Resolve Micro Panel

I also tested the smaller, bus-powered DaVinci Resolve Micro panel. The Micro panel is just the right size for an editor or a DIT on set. It’s smaller than the Mini (tested previously in another review), because it doesn’t have the upward slanting portion in the back; therefore, it’s a better physical fit between your computer keyboard and display. You don’t have to shuffle desk real estate between tools, as you do with the Micro panel. In spite of not having the extra controls and LCD displays of the Mini, the Micro panel combines most of the control functions you need for fast grading. If you are an editor who is heavy into color correction, then this is a must-have for Resolve.

I took an instant liking to the Micro. You can use both hands to quickly and intuitively work the trackballs and knob controls, making for faster and better correction. It’s tactile, with next and previous clip buttons to quickly advance through the timeline, so you can keep your eyes on the screen. I grade in Resolve, Avid, Premiere Pro, and Final Cut Pro X, and all of that is with a mouse. Using the panel easily resulted in faster grading by a factor at least 3X or 4X. I also achieved better-looking corrections with fewer steps or processes than grading in any of these other applications.

Conclusion

Overall, there’s a lot to love about Resolve, in spite of a few rough edges. In general, it seems more stable under macOS Sierra than with High Sierra. If you use Resolve on a Mac, then you are stuck dealing with Apple’s platform changes. For example, recent Macs that use an Nvidia GPU are at a disadvantage under High Sierra, because Nvidia is just now developing drivers for CUDA under this OS. I experienced a number of crashes running Resolve 14 on my 2014 MacBook Pro until I manually changed the Resolve hardware configuration under Resolve’s preferences from CUDA to using Metal. When I installed what was supposed to be the newest CUDA driver, I still received a prompt that no CUDA-compliant card was present. But, it’s working fine using Metal. Macs with AMD GPUs should be fine.

Resolve 14 is a dense tool, with a lot of depth in various menus, which some may find daunting. This review would be a lot longer if I went even deeper into the many specific features of this application. Yet, it is easy for new users to hit the ground running and then learn as they go. For many, this is their mythical “Final Cut Pro 8”. In any case, DaVinci Resolve 14 is the best incarnation of the all-in-one concept to date. If you add Blackmagic Design’s Fusion visual effects software into the mix (also available in free and paid versions), the result is a combination that’s tough to beat at any price.

Blackmagic Design’s engineers have shown impressive development over a very short period of time, so I fully expect Blackmagic to give the three “A” companies a run for their money. Even if you use another tool as your main editing application, Resolve is a great addition to the toolbox. Using it becomes addictive. Give it a try and you might just find it becomes your first choice.

©2017, 2018 Oliver Peters