BorisFX BCC 10

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Boris Continuum Complete (BCC) by BorisFX is the epitome of the term “Swiss Army knife” when it comes to talking about plug-ins. Most editors will pick this package over others, if they can only have one toolkit to cover a diverse range of picture enhancements. In the past year, BorisFX has upgraded this toolkit with new effects, expanded to add more NLE hosts, and integrated mocha’s Academy Award-winning planar tracking technology after the acquisition of Imagineer Systems. This set of plug-ins is now up to version BCC10. BorisFX has not only added new effects to BCC10, but also expanded its licensing options to include multi-host and subscription options.

Since many users now work with several NLEs, multi-host licensing makes a lot of sense. One purchase with a single serial number covers the installation for each of the various applications. There are two multi-host license versions: one for Avid/Adobe/Apple/OFX and the second that doesn’t include Avid. OFX licensing covers the installation for Blackmagic Design DaVinci Resolve, as well as Sony Vegas Pro for PC users.

What’s new in BCC10

df3216_bcc10_10Boris Continuum Complete version 10 includes over 230 effects within 16 different categories, like 3D Objects, Art Looks, Particles, Perspective and more. Each effect comes with numerous presets for a total of over 2,500 presets in all. There are plenty of new tools in BCC10, but the biggest news is that each effect filter integrates mocha planar tracking. BorisFX has always included Pixel Chooser as a way of masking objects. Now each filter also lets you launch the mocha interface right from inside the plug-in’s effect control panel. For example, if you are applying skin smoothing to only your talent’s forehead using the new BCC Beauty Studio, simply launch mocha, create a mask for the forehead and track the talent’s movement within the shot. The mask and track are saved within the plug-in, so you can instantly see the results.

df3216_bcc10_05A second big change is the addition and integration of the FX Browser. Each plug-in effect lets you launch the FX Browser interface to display how each of the various presets for that effect would look when applied to the selected clip. You can preview the whole clip, not just a thumbnail. FX Browser is also a standalone effect that can be applied to the clip. When you use it that way, then all presets for all filters can be previewed. While FX Browser has been implemented in past versions in some of the hosts, this is the first time that it’s become an integrated part of the BCC package across all NLEs.

df3216_bcc10_02BCC10 includes two new “studio” tools, as well as a number of new individual effects. BCC Beauty Studio is a set of tools in a single filter targeted at image retouching, especially the skin texture of talent. Photographers retouch “glamor” shots to reduce or remove blemishes, so Photoshop-style retouching is almost expected these days. This is the digital video equivalent. As with most skin smoothing filters, BCC Beauty Studio uses skin keying algorithms to isolate skin colors. It then blurs skin texture, but also lets the editor adjust contrast, color correction, and even add a subtle glow to image highlights. Of course, as I mentioned above, mocha masking and tracking is integrated for the ultimate control in where and how the effect is applied.

The second new, complex filter is BCC Title Studio. This is an integrated 3D titling tool that can be used based on templates within the effects browser or by launching the separate Title Studio interface. Editors familiar with BorisFX products will recognize this titling interface as essentially Boris RED right inside of their NLE. Not only can you create titles, but also more advanced motion graphics. You can even import objects, EPS and image files for 3D effects, including the addition of materials and shading. As with other BorisFX tilting tools, you can animate text on and off the screen.

df3216_bcc10_03In addition to these two large plug-ins, BCC10 also gained nine new filters and transitions. These include BCC Remover (fills in missing pixels or removes objects using cloning) and BCC Drop-out Fixer (restores damaged footage). For the folks who have to deal with a lot of 4×3 content and vertical cell phone footage, there’s BCC Reframer. Unlike the usual approach where the same image is stretched and blurred behind the vertical shot, this filter includes options to stylize the foreground and background.

df3216_bcc10_11The trend these days is to embrace image “defects” as a creative effect, so two of the new filters are BCC Light Leaks and BCC Video Glitch. Each adds organic, distressed effects, like in-camera light contamination and corrupted digital video artifacts. To go along with this, there are also four new transitions, including a BCC Light Leaks Dissolve, Cross Glitch, Cross Zoom and Cross Melt. Of these, the light leaks, glitch and zoom transitions are about what you’d expect from the name, however, the melt transition seems rather unique. In addition to the underlying dissolve between two images, there are a variety of effects options that can be applied as part of this transition. Many of these are glass, plastic, prism or streak effects, which add an interesting twist to this style of transition.

In use

df3216_bcc10_04The new BCC10 package works within the established hosts much like it always has, so no surprises there. The Boris Continuum Complete package used to come bundled with Avid Media Composer, but unfortunately that’s no longer the case. Avid editors who want the full BCC set have to purchase it. As with most plug-ins, After Effects is generally the best host when adjustment and manipulation of effects are required.

df3216_bcc10_09A new NLE to consider is DaVinci Resolve. Many are testing the waters to see if Resolve could become their NLE of choice. Blackmagic Design introduced Resolve 12.5 with even more focus on its editing toolset, including new, built-in effect filters and transitions. In my testing, BCC10 works reasonably well with Resolve 12.5 once you get used to where the effects are. Resolve uses a modal design with editing and color correction split into separate modes or pages. BCC10 transition effects only show up in the OFX library of the edit page. For filter effects, which are applied to the whole clip, you have to go to the color page. During the color correction process you may add any filter effect, but it has to be applied to a node. If you apply more than one filter, you have to add a new node for each filter. With the initial release of BCC10, mocha did not work within Resolve. If you tried to launch it, a message came up that this functionality would be added at a later time. In May, BorisFX released BCC10.2, which included mocha for both Resolve 12.5 and Vegas Pro. To use the BCC10 effects with Resolve 12.5 you need the paid Studio version and not the free version of Resolve.

df3216_bcc10_07BorisFX BCC10 is definitely a solid update, with new features, mocha integration and better GPU-based performance. It runs best in After Effects CC, Premiere Pro CC and Avid Media Composer. The built-in effects tools are pretty good in After Effects, Final Cut Pro X and Resolve 12.5 – meaning you might get by without needing what BCC10 has to offer. On the other hand, they are unfortunately very mediocre in Premiere Pro or Media Composer. If one of those is your editing axe, then BCC10 becomes an essential purchase, if you want to improve the capabilities of your editing application. Regardless of which tool you use, BCC10 will give you more options to stretch your creativity.

df3216_bcc10_08On a related note, at IBC 2016 in Amsterdam, BorisFX announced the acquisition of GenArts. This means that the Sapphire effects are now housed under the BorisFX umbrella, which could make for some interesting bundling options in the future. As with their integration of mocha tracking into the BCC effects, future versions of BCC and/or Sapphire might also see a sharing of compatible technologies across these two effects families. Stay tuned.

Originally written for Digital Video magazine / Creative Planet Network

©2016 Oliver Peters